Environmental change and enteric zoonoses in New Zealand: a systematic review of the evidence.

Conclusions: Enteric disease occurrence in NZ is associated with climate variability and agricultural land use. However, these relationships interact with demographic factors to influence disease patterns. Implications: Improved understanding of how environmental and social factors interact can inform effective public health interventions under scenarios of projected environmental change. PMID: 25307352 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Public Health Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 4 April 2020Source: Food ControlAuthor(s): Xinrui Lv, Li Wang, Jingfeng Zhang, Haiyan Zeng, Xun Chen, Lei Shi, Hualing Cui, Xiaoxin He, Lichao Zhao
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Abstract Giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis are recognized by the WHO as important emerging diseases of the 21st century. Symptoms are similar and include diarrhoea and vomiting, which may be severe, even life-threatening, for the immunocompromised and children under five years of age. Between 2013 and 2017, the Institute for Public Health in Serbia recorded 10 waterborne epidemics that manifested as gastrointestinal disease. Routine testing for enteropathogenic bacteria and viruses did not identify the aetiological agents of these outbreaks. As water is not examined for the presence of protozoa in Serbia, we perfor...
Source: Experimental Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: Exp Parasitol Source Type: research
, Carmena D Abstract Domestic dogs and cats may act as natural reservoirs of a large number of zoonotic pathogens, including the enteric parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp., the most relevant protozoan species causing gastrointestinal disease worldwide. A cross-sectional epidemiological study aiming to assess the prevalence and molecular diversity of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. was conducted in an animal rescue centre in the province of Álava (Northern Spain). A total of 194 and 65 faecal dropping samples from individual dogs and cats, respectively, were collected between Novemb...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 January 2017 Source:Veterinary Parasitology Author(s): Marta Mateo, Marta Hernández de Mingo, Aida de Lucio, Lucía Morales, Ana Balseiro, Alberto Espí, Marta Barral, José Francisco Lima Barbero, Miguel Ángel Habela, José L. Fernández-García, Rafael Calero Bernal, Pamela C. Köster, Guillermo A. Cardona, David Carmena There is a surprisingly scarce amount of epidemiological and molecular data on the prevalence, frequency, and diversity of the intestinal protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in wildlif...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Abstract Cryptosporidiosis, microsporidiosis, and giardiasis contribute significantly to the high burden of zoonotic diarrhea worldwide. Goats constitute an important species in animal agriculture by providing cashmere wool, meat, and dairy products for human consumption. However, zoonotic pathogens with the potential to cause morbidity and to degrade production have been reported frequently in goats recently. The present study examined 629 fecal specimens from goats, including 315 cashmere goats, 170 dairy goats and 144 meat goats, in multiple cities of Shaanxi and Henan provinces, northwestern and central China,...
Source: Infection, Genetics and Evolution - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Infect Genet Evol Source Type: research
Summary There appears to be no published information concerning the awareness and knowledge about diarrhoea caused by Cryptosporidium spp. or Giardia lamblia among US paediatricians and caregivers of young children. Two concurrent, separate surveys were conducted among paediatricians and caregivers (~1000 respondents in each survey) of children ages 1–12 years concerning their knowledge, perceptions and attitudes in the diagnosis and treatment of parasitic diarrhoea. Awareness of parasite‐induced diarrhoea was low for specific aspects among both paediatricians and caregivers. Educational efforts to improve awa...
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In this study, 197 fresh fecal samples from 8 NHP species in Qinling Mountains, northwestern China, were collected and examined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. The results showed that 35 (17.8%) samples were positive for tested parasites, including Cryptosporidium spp. (3.0%), G. intestinalis (2.0%), and E. bieneusi (12.7%). Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 6 fecal samples of Macaca mulatta, and were identified as C. parvum (n=1) and C. andersoni (n=5). Subtyping analysis showed Cryptosporidium spp. belonged to the C. andersoni MLST subtype (A4, A4, A4, and A1) and C. parvum 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) ...
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Abstract Genetic study of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi at species/assemblage/genotype/subtype level facilitates understanding their mechanical transmissions and underpins their control. A total of 191 fresh faecal samples were collected from golden takins in China and examined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Cryptosporidium spp. was detected in 15 faecal samples (7.9%), including C. parvum (2/15) and C. andersoni (13/15). MLST tool identified C. andersoni subtypes (A1, A4, A4, A1) and (A4, A4, A4, A1), and C. parvum gp60 gene subtypeIId A19G1. The prevalence of G....
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Abstract Little is known of the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in domestic cats in Western Australia and their potential role as zoonotic reservoirs for human infection. In the present study, a total of 345 faecal samples from four different sources were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia by PCR and genotyped by sequence analysis. Oocyst numbers and cyst numbers for Cryptosporidium and Giardia respectively were also determined using quantitative PCR assays. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in 9.9% (95% CI 6.7-13.0) and 10.1% (95% CI 7.0-13.3) of cats in Western Australia r...
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