Hypothermia during Treatment with Aripiprazole.

We report the case of a patient (92 years) suffering from dementia with a hypothermia during treatment with aripiprazole. PMID: 30149396 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Psychiatrische Praxis - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatr Prax Source Type: research

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Postoperative delirium (POD) may impact 72% of surgical patients and has been associated with increased hospital length of stay, one-month mortality, post-acute discharge to long-term care, and a higher probability of developing dementia. These adverse events contribute to significant increases in healthcare costs.
Source: Journal of PeriAnesthesia Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: ASPAN National Conference Abstract Source Type: research
Conclusions Dysautonomic symptoms frequently occuring in α-synucleinopathies comprise cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital and thermoregulatory disturbances. These symptoms reduce quality of life and worsen prognosis. The understanding of their pathophysiology, as well as the detection of α-synuclein deposition and autonomic dysfunction in the premotor stages of α-synucleinopathies may be key for identifying novel treatment targets and improving clinical outcomes. While causative treatment is not yet available, improvement of quality of life can be achieved by personalized symptomatic treatment r...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 3 November 2018Source: Journal of Clinical NeuroscienceAuthor(s): Aimalohi Esechie, Anish Bhardwaj, Todd Masel, Mukaila RajiAbstractElderly individuals are a fast-rising segment of the US population and are at high risk of permanent disability and premature death secondary to traumatic injuries such as burn injury. The current paper will review the extant literature to understand the prevalence of burn injury in the elderly, the neurocognitive complications unique to the aged that places this cohort at risk, and evidence-based recommendations to reduce the early and late neurocognitive ef...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Imagine a world in which caring for the deeply forgetful is deemed a privilege and a trust.By Stephen PostAlzheimer's Reading RoomI do believe that we will see a spiritual-cultural shift away from the ideology of “hyper-cognitive values” that has regrettably blinded us to the enduring selves underlying the deeply forgetful.How can we encounter the deeply forgetful outside of hyper-cognitive ideologies?Dementia Patients are People TooHow can we bear witness to the reality that persons with this cognitive disability possess inherent qualities, and create a culture where all are welcomed and celebrated regardless ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alz alzheimers bond cruelty deeply forgetful dehumanizing others demenitia glass half full love privilege self identity Spiritual Cultural Evolution Stephen Post trust Source Type: blogs
This study included 647 patients 80 to 106 years of age who had audiometric evaluations at an academic medical center (141 had multiple audiograms). The degree of hearing loss was compared across the following age brackets: 80 to 84 years, 85 to 89 years, 90 to 94 years, and 95 years and older. From an individual perspective, the rate of hearing decrease between 2 audiograms was compared with age. The researchers found that changes in hearing among age brackets were higher during the 10th decade of life than the 9th decade at all frequencies for all the patients (average age, 90 years). Correspondingly, the annual rate of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 23 July 2015 Source:Neuroscience Letters, Volume 600 Author(s): Raquel Baeta-Corral , Ruti Defrin , Chagi G. Pick , Lydia Giménez-Llort Despite the impact of pain in cognitive dysfunctions and affective disorders has been largely studied, the research that examines pain dimensions in cognitive impairment or dementia is still scarce. In patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias, management of pain is challenging. While the sensory-discriminative dimension of pain is preserved, the cognitive-evaluative and the affective-motivational pain dimensions are affected. Due to the ...
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
This was a descriptive study of elderly persons with dementia who were found dead after becoming lost in the community. Nineteen forensic autopsy cases were performed at Kochi Medical School, Japan. The mean age of the patients (9 males and 10 females) was 82.1 ± 6.6 years. Causes of death were drowning (n = 8), trauma (n = 5), hypothermia (n = 2), and debilitation possibly due to fatigue (n = 1) or were unknown (n = 3). Thirteen (68%) individuals had been reported missing, most at least 6 hours after they had left. They moved on foot (n = 14), by car (n = 3), or by bicycle (n = 2). Distances from residences to spot...
Source: American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Current Topics in Research Source Type: research
What does animal hibernation have to do with Alzheimer's? More than you might think. According to new research, the way that critters wake up from a long winter's rest could help scientists devise new treatments for dementia. Research from Leicester University have isolated a cold-activated protein, RBM3, which helps restore brain activity of animals that are coming out of long hibernation periods. Though the protein also exists in humans, it's been found to be missing among Alzheimer's patients, whose brains also commonly have a reduced number of synapses. Here's how it works: When animals go into hibernation, their n...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Conclusion The researchers have shown how cooling is protective against the loss of synapses in the early stages of rodent forms of Alzheimer's disease and a form of prion disease. Cooling also increased how long prion-infected mice survived. But cooling was not protective in the later stages of the diseases. The researchers found this may in part be because of the protein RBM3, which is stimulated during cooling. They found levels of RBM3 increased in the early stages of the diseases when the mice were cooled, but did not in the later stages. Stimulating this protein without cooling the mice also slowed down the loss of...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news
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