Lumpectomy + Radiation May Cut Breast Cancer Mortality in DCIS

MONDAY, Aug. 20, 2018 -- Treatment with lumpectomy and radiotherapy is associated with a reduction in breast cancer mortality versus lumpectomy or mastectomy alone among patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to a study published...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Related Links:

If you dread your annual mammogram, you’re not alone. For many women, this breast cancer screening examination can be painful, stressful, and just an overall hassle. You may wonder, are you old enough to give it up? If you’re over age 75, the answer is: maybe or maybe not. The fact is, breast cancer screening isn’t right for all older adults, but there’s no expert consensus on the right age to stop. This is mostly because scientific evidence in this area is lacking, says Dr. Kathryn Rexrode, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of the Division of Women’s Health a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Healthy Aging Managing your health care Screening Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Abstract We aimed to evaluate the surgical margin outcomes and re-excision rates in patients undergoing bracketed seed localization of biopsy-proven breast cancer detected on screening mammogram. After approval by our Institutional Review Board, we retrospectively identified patients who had undergone iodine-125 seed localized lumpectomy at our institution from January 2010 to June 2017 by one of two fellowship-trained breast surgeons. Of those patients, a subset of 25 patients were identified who had undergone bracketed seed localization, defined as two or more seeds used to delineate the radiographic borders of ...
Source: The American Surgeon - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Am Surg Source Type: research
ConclusionsA novel system using supine MRI images co-registered with intraoperative optical scanning and tracking enabled tumors to be resected with a trend toward a lower positive margin rate compared with wire-localized partial mastectomy. Margin positivity was more likely when imaging underestimated pathologic tumor size.
Source: Annals of Surgical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
AbstractTreatment for ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) has historically been extrapolated from studies of invasive breast cancer. Accepted local therapy approaches range from small local excisions, with or without radiation, to bilateral mastectomies. Systemic treatment with endocrine therapy is often recommended for hormone positive patients. With improvements in imaging, pathologic review, and treatment techniques in the modern era, combined with new information regarding tumor biology, the management of DCIS is rapidly evolving. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment is now more important than ever, with a shift towar...
Source: Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
From time to time I have commented on the controversies over cancer screening. Most people assume that screening is an unqualified good, that early detection of cancer saves lives. Whenever some panel proposes recommending less screening, we hear screaming and yelling from advocates who claim they are trying to " ration " health care to save money at the expense of people's lives.In fact,as a bunch of Australians and a Minnesotan explain in BMJ, there are a few conditions called " cancer " that you are better off not treating, or perhaps treating very conservatively. These include what is called ductal ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - Category: American Health Source Type: blogs
(JAMA Network) Lumpectomy plus radiation was associated with a small clinical benefit in reduced risk of breast cancer death compared with lumpectomy or mastectomy alone   in women   with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a noninvasive early form of breast cancer.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 27 March 2018Source: European Journal of Obstetrics &Gynecology and Reproductive BiologyAuthor(s): Filip E.F. Thiessen, Wiebren A.A. Tjalma, Thierry TonduAbstractConservative breast surgery followed by irradiation, often referred to as Breast conserving therapy (BCT), has replaced modified radical mastectomy for the treatment of early stage invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). About 10% to 40% of the patients treated with BCT have poor cosmetic outcome results. Small tumours in large breasts can be successfully treated by lumpectomy and radiotherapy, with good c...
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Authors: Chaudhry AT, Koulis TA, Speers C, Olson RA Abstract Purpose: The mainstay of treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis) involves surgery in the form of mastectomy or lumpectomy. Inconsistency in the use of endocrine therapy (et) for dcis is evident worldwide. We sought to assess the variation in et prescribing for patients with dcis across a population-based radiotherapy (rt) program and to identify variables that predict its use. Methods: Data from a breast cancer database were obtained for women diagnosed with dcis in British Columbia from 2009 to 2014. Associations between et use and patient char...
Source: Current Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Curr Oncol Source Type: research
Conservative breast surgery followed by irradiation, often referred to as Breast conserving therapy (BCT), has replaced modified radical mastectomy for the treatment of early stage invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). About 10% to 40% of the patients treated with BCT have poor cosmetic outcome results. Small tumours in large breasts can be successfully treated by lumpectomy and radiotherapy, with good cosmetic outcome. However when the tumour breast ratio is higher, the cosmetic outcome can be very disappointing.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Full length article Source Type: research
Conservative breast surgery followed by irradiation, often referred to as Breast conserving therapy (BCT), has replaced modified radical mastectomy for the treatment of early stage invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). About 10% to 40% of the patients treated with BCT have poor cosmetic outcome results. Small tumours in large breasts can be successfully treated by lumpectomy and radiotherapy, with good cosmetic outcome. However when the tumour breast ratio is higher, the cosmetic outcome can be very disappointing.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Full length article Source Type: research
More News: Breast Cancer | Breast Carcinoma | Breast Lumpectomy | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Carcinoma | Carcinoma in Situ | DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma in Situ) | Ductal Carcinoma | Lumpectomy | Mastectomy | Pharmaceuticals | Study