Antibiotics in Early Life and Allergic Disorders

To the Editor We read with interest the Mitre et al article describing associations between acid-suppressive medications, antibiotics, and subsequent pediatric allergic disease. Because histamine-2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are commonly prescribed for children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the authors presented analyses of associations between H2RAs and allergic diseases, including food allergy, for all children, and only those dwho received a diagnosis of GERD. However, compared with any food allergy or individual foods among children given H2RAs, milk allergy has both a higher incidence and higher hazards ratios, which may partially drive the strong association between H2RAs and “any food allergy.” Infants with milk allergy often tolerate milk by early childhood, an observation that the authors did not consider herein. Because the ability to consider tolerance may not have been possible in a health care database study, an analysis excluding children with only milk aller gy would have been interesting. Similarly, we would have liked to have seen results for individual food allergies among the children with GERD.
Source: JAMA Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research

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(CNN) — When heartburn or ulcer pain strikes, drugs can target stomach acid to calm bellies and offer relief. But a new study suggests the medications may come with a hive-inducing side effect: allergies. After analyzing health insurance data from more than 8 million people in Austria, researchers found that prescriptions of anti-allergy medications surged in those who were prescribed stomach acid inhibitors, a class of drugs that includes proton-pump inhibitors and H2 blockers. The findings, published Tuesday in the medical journal Nature Communications, suggest that disrupting the stomach’s delicate balance o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Allergies CNN Heartburn Source Type: news
During the 20th century, medicine became very good at compartmentalizing different systems of the body in order to understand them better. However, today we are increasingly realizing that different systems of the body are interconnected and cannot be completely understood in isolation. The brain-gut connection is one very important example of this phenomenon. Anatomy of the brain-gut connection What exactly is the connection between brain and gut? The brain sends signals to the digestive, or gastrointestinal (GI), tract via the sympathetic (“fight or flight”) nervous system and the parasympathetic (“rest...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Digestive Disorders Health Mind body medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs
AbstractAllergic eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, allergen-mediated inflammatory disease of the esophagus, and the most common cause of prolonged dysphagia in children and young adults in the developed world. While initially undistinguished from gastroesophageal reflux disease-associated esophageal eosinophilia, EoE is now recognized as a clinically distinct entity that shares fundamental inflammatory features of other allergic conditions and is similarly increasing in incidence and prevalence. The clinical and epidemiologic associations between EoE and other allergic manifestations are well established. In add...
Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Antibiotics can be lifesaving, but they can have serious downsides — including increasing the risk of obesity when they are given early in life, according to a recent study. Antibiotics kill bacteria. That can be a very good thing when the bacteria are causing a serious infection. But antibiotics don’t limit themselves to killing infection-causing bacteria; they kill other bacteria in the body, too. And that can be a very bad thing. Our bodies are full of bacteria. These bacteria, part of our microbiome, are important. Along with other micro-organisms in our body, they play a role in how we digest foods, in nor...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Infectious diseases Parenting Source Type: blogs
AbstractAtopic disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are some of the most common medical conditions treated by primary care physicians and specialists alike. The observation that atopic disorders, like asthma, allergic rhinitis and sinusitis, food allergies, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis are common comorbidities in patients with GERD raises the question of the nature of the relationship that may exist between GERD and atopic disorders. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of GERD, its effect on the immune system, the effect of acid-blocking medications on aller...
Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Allergies are on the rise, especially food allergies. While nobody knows for sure why this is happening, a leading theory is that we may be doing things that mess up our natural microbiome. Our microbiome is the trillions of organisms that live on and in our bodies, such as bacteria, archaea, fungi, and viruses. We generally think of these organisms as “germs” that can cause illness — and while they can, in some situations it turns out that the right organisms in the right balance actually help keep us healthy. Our microbiome affects how we digest foods, stay at a healthy we...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Allergies Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
This study examined the differences between patients with FA who had a history of AD and those who did not have a history of AD.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Dysphagia is a common symptom that is important to recognise and appropriately manage, given that causes include life threatening oesophageal neoplasia, oropharyngeal dysfunction, the risk of aspiration, as well as chronic disabling gastroesophageal reflux (GORD). The predominant causes of dysphagia varies between cohorts depending on the interplay between genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors, and is changing with time. Currently in white Caucasian societies adopting a western lifestyle, obesity is common and thus associated gastroesophageal reflux disease is increasingly diagnosed. Simil...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: During the last five years, constipation was the first gastrointestinal diagnosis followed by food allergy, in agreement with the global trend. It is essential, therefore, to apply diagnostic algorithms, timely treatment, and prevention. PMID: 28968008 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Biomedica Source Type: research
Discussion Cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) is one of the most common food allergies. It is estimated to have an incidence of 2-7.5% in infants and a prevalence of 0.5% in breastfeed infants. The prevalence decreases with age at 1% in children> or = 6 years. CMPA does not have a laboratory test and therefore is a clinical diagnosis. It is defined as a “hypersensitivity reaction brought on by specific immunologic mechanisms to cow’s milk.” Generally symptoms present within the first month of life and involve 2 of more systems with 2 or more symptoms. Systems are dermatologic (including atopic der...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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