Lack of serological evidence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in virus exposed camel abattoir workers in Nigeria, 2016.

Conclusion: There is a need for more studies to investigate whether or not zoonotic transmission of MERS-CoV does take place in Africa. PMID: 30107872 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Euro Surveill - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Euro Surveill Source Type: research

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The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a novel lethal zoonotic disease of humans caused by the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Although MERS is endemic to the Middle East, travelers have exported MERS-CoV on return to their home countries. Clinical manifestations range from mild to severe acute respiratory disease and death. The elderly, immunocompromised, and those with chronic comorbid liver, lung, and hepatic conditions have a high mortality rate. There is no specific treatment. Person-to-person spread causes hospital and household outbreaks, and thus improved compliance with internationally recommended infection c...
Source: Infectious Diseases Clinics of North America - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: 2019Source: Advances in Virus Research, Volume 105Author(s): M. Alejandra Tortorici, David VeeslerAbstractCoronaviruses (CoVs) have caused outbreaks of deadly pneumonia in humans since the beginning of the 21st century. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged in 2002 and was responsible for an epidemic that spread to five continents with a fatality rate of 10% before being contained in 2003 (with additional cases reported in 2004). The Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in the Arabian Peninsula in 2012 and has caused recurrent outbreaks in humans w...
Source: Advances in Virus Research - Category: Virology Source Type: research
by Dan Lu, Kefang Liu, Di Zhang, Can Yue, Qiong Lu, Hao Cheng, Liang Wang, Yan Chai, Jianxun Qi, Lin-Fa Wang, George F. Gao, William J. Liu Bats harbor many zoonotic viruses, including highly pathogenic viruses of humans and other mammals, but they are typically asymptomatic in bats. To further understand the antiviral immunity of bats, we screened and identified a series of bat major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I Ptal-N*01:01– binding peptides derived from four different bat-borne viruses, i.e., Hendra virus (HeV), Ebola virus (EBOV), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and H17N10 influenz...
Source: PLoS Biology: Archived Table of Contents - Category: Biology Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 22 August 2019Source: Advances in Virus ResearchAuthor(s): M. Alejandra Tortorici, David VeeslerAbstractCoronaviruses (CoVs) have caused outbreaks of deadly pneumonia in humans since the beginning of the 21st century. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) emerged in 2002 and was responsible for an epidemic that spread to five continents with a fatality rate of 10% before being contained in 2003 (with additional cases reported in 2004). The Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in the Arabian Peninsula in 2012 and has caused recurrent outbre...
Source: Advances in Virus Research - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Encoded Accessory Proteins Impair MDA5-and TBK1-Mediated Activation of NF-κB. J Microbiol Biotechnol. 2019 Aug 14;: Authors: Lee JY, Bae S, Myoung J Abstract Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a newly emerging coronavirus which is zoonotic from bats and camels. Its infection in humans can be fatal especially in patients with preexisting conditions due to smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Among the 25 proteins encoded by MERS-CoV, 5 accessory proteins seem to be involved in viral evasion of the host immun...
Source: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tags: J Microbiol Biotechnol Source Type: research
Du Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging virus that was first reported in humans in June 2012 [...]
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Abstract Human coronavirus (HCoV) infection causes respiratory diseases with mild to severe outcomes. In the last 15 years, we have witnessed the emergence of two zoonotic, highly pathogenic HCoVs: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Replication of HCoV is regulated by a diversity of host factors and induces drastic alterations in cellular structure and physiology. Activation of critical signaling pathways during HCoV infection modulates the induction of antiviral immune response and contributes to the pathogenesis of HCoV. Recent st...
Source: Annual Review of Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Annu Rev Microbiol Source Type: research
Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is an emerging respiratory disease caused by the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). MERS has been endemic to Saudi Arabia since 2012. The reservoir of MERS-CoV is the dromedary camel, suggesting that MERS is primarily a zoonotic disease. MERS-CoV is common in dromedaries throughout the Middle East, North Africa, and East Africa as evidenced by neutralizing antibodies against MERS-CoV; however, human cases have remained limited to the Middle East. To better understand the cause of this difference, the virological properties of African camel MERS-CoV were analyzed based on the spike (S) prot...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, we firstly carried out whole genome characterization of the SARS-like bat coronavirus discovered in the Republic of Korea; however, it presumably has no human infectivity. However, continuous surveillance and genomic characterization of coronaviru ses from bats are necessary due to potential risks of human infection induced by genetic mutation.
Source: Virus Genes - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Yíngyún Caì1†, Shuǐqìng Yú1†, Rohit K. Jangra2, Elena N. Postnikova1, Jiro Wada1, Robert B. Tesh3, Sean P. J. Whelan4, Michael Lauck5, Michael R. Wiley6, Courtney L. Finch1, Sheli R. Radoshitzky6, David H. O’Connor5, Gustavo Palacios6, Kartik Chandran2, Charles Y. Chiu7 and Jens H. Kuhn1* 1Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD, United States 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States 3Depart...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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