Five-month-old receives heart-lung transplant an is youngest in 10 years to undergo the surgery

Jack Palmer, of Kansas City, Missouri, became the 20th infant under a year old to undergo a heart-lung transplant after he was born in January with a congenital heart defect.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Almost exactly a year ago, Tiffany and Chuck Palmer were told to expect a stillborn baby. Now, their son is eight months, after getting both his heart and lungs replaced. And he is home in Kansas City.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
ConclusionIn this single-center retrospective study, SIPAT did not predict cumulative re-admissions. Further study is required to validate SIPAT before clinical implementation.
Source: Heart and Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion: This study demonstrates that organ transplant recipients, and especially children, are at increased risk of postoperative complications after cochlear implantation in comparison with healthy CI recipients.
Source: Otology and Neurotology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: Cochlear Implants Source Type: research
The Stanford integrated psychosocial assessment for transplantation (SIPAT) is a validated psychosocial evaluation tool in the transplant population.
Source: Heart and Lung - Category: Intensive Care Authors: Source Type: research
Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to chronic lung disease (Group 3 PH) have poor long-term outcomes. However, predictors of survival in Group 3 PH are not well described.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Science Source Type: research
Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) represent a growing, albeit still small, proportion of heart transplant (HT) recipients (1, 2). These patients frequently present with complex anatomy and physiology, and atypical manifestations of cardiac failure. Despite being younger than other HT candidates, they have higher risk for adverse outcomes early after HT. This relates to prior thoracic operations, longer allograft ischemic time, a high prevalence of sensitization, less frequent use of pre-transplant mechanical circulatory support (1), and underappreciated end-organ dysfunction.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial for “Center Volume and Post-Transplant Survival Among Adults with Congenital Heart Disease”, Menachem Source Type: research
Lung transplant recipients are at very high risk of skin cancer. Omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) are anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating and potentially could reduce this risk. We assessed the feasibility of omega-3 FA supplementation to reduce skin cancer among these patients.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Clinical Science Source Type: research
Waitlist mortality for lung transplant recipients continues to be a problem for transplant programs, with recent analysis from the UNOS database suggesting 14.7 percent of patients die or are delisted awaiting donor organ allocation.1 With the ongoing imbalance between graft supply and recipient demand, organ distribution policies have evolved to prioritize allocation to those patients with the least amount of time to live. In designing such allocation algorithms, four basic ethical principles are generally considered including patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
The US lung allocation system prioritizes allocation based upon medical urgency and benefit but does not address a federal mandate for broader geographic organ sharing. Whether broader geographic sharing of donor lungs would improve lung transplant waitlist outcomes is unknown.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Intralipid (ILP), a clinically used lipid emulsion, protects from cardiac ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury by inhibiting opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore.1 This reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.2 We hypothesized that ILP would also attenuate pulmonary I/R injury. Here we examine the effect of ILP on mediators of tissue damage in a rat pulmonary I/R model and on clinically relevant outcomes in a rat orthotopic lung transplantation model.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Research Correspondence Source Type: research
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