New Project Will Bring High-Quality HIV Services to the People Who Need Them Most in Five Central American Countries

August 07, 2018​IntraHealth International will expand its HIV prevention, care, and treatment efforts in Central America with a new $15 million award from the U.S. Agency for International Development. The Strengthening Care and Treatment Cascade Project will help El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama improve the quality and reach of their HIV services and allocate more resources where they are most needed.While the overall HIV prevalence is low in these countries, the epidemic is concentrated among key groups, including men who have sex with men, transgender women, and female sex workers. Despite these realities, health policy and practice have continued to prioritize testing and treatment for the general population and pregnant women over these groups.IntraHealth and our partners will focus on reaching these clients with high-quality, stigma-free services and work together to enroll and retain as many people living with HIV as possible on treatment. The project will also prioritize identifying and treating common HIV comorbidities, including tuberculosis.Every client —regardless of background, gender, or status—must be able to expect and receive respectful, high-quality health services, without bias. All five countries support the UNAIDS 90-90-90 goals (90% of HIV-positive people knowing their status, 90% of people diagnosed with HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 90% of clients on ART achieving viral load suppression by 2020). Amo...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news

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July 25, 2018Close to 800,000 Zambians received HIV services —including testing, counseling, antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis screening, and more—through IntraHealth International’sHTC Project, which for five years focused on serving clients who are often the most difficult (and crucial) to reach.Throughout 2012 –2018, the project provided HIV care and services to female sex workers, men who have sex with men, transgendered individuals, prison inmates, couples, pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, adolescent girls and young women, adolescent boys and young men, cross-border traders, seasona...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
July 25, 2018Close to 800,000 Zambians received HIV services —including testing, counseling, antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis screening, and more—through IntraHealth International’sHTC Project, which for five years focused on serving clients who are often the most difficult (and crucial) to reach.Throughout 2012 –2018, the project provided HIV care and services to female sex workers, men who have sex with men, transgendered individuals, prison inmates, couples, pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, adolescent girls and young women, adolescent boys and young men, cross-border traders, seasona...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
Pregnant women remain the most vulnerable high-risk population to the devastating impact of the on-going human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) generalized epidemic and co-infection with Tuberculosis in Nigeria. By the end of 2017, the country ranked the second highest in adult HIV-infected individuals and the highest population of orphans due to AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed the epidemiology of HIV among pregnant women across ten facilities in south-west Nigeria.
Source: Journal of Infection and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
David Bryden is the TB Advocacy Officer at RESULTS Educational Fund, a US-based non-profit working to end global poverty.By David BrydenWASHINGTON DC, Mar 22 2018 (IPS)A good education for every child is an urgent global imperative, but what if entering schools puts children at serious health risks? Tuberculosis (TB), the single biggest infectious disease killer, poses a major risk for young people in countries with high prevalence of TB, and schools are among the places where they are most likely to catch it. A young boy suspected with TB. Credit: The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and MalariaThe United Nations, which comm...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Global Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
August 14, 2017Whether he ’s on his bike, giving a sermon, or counseling at the clinic, Reverend Lusale is ready to talk to anyone about HIV.When the first AIDS case struck Zambia in 1984, Reverend Lusale was two years away from graduating from theology school, and did not know the impact the virus would have on Zambians ’ lives, or on his own.At its peak in Zambia in 2001, when21.5% of the adult population was infected, he realized there was something he could do to help. Reverend Lusale decided to go for training as an HIV counsellor.Today he works as part ofIntraHealth International’s team of lay couns...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
Global health agencies are succeeding in getting more people with HIV on antiretroviral therapy, a combination of drugs that suppress the virus to undetectable levels in the blood and reduce the risk of transmission to another person. But scientists are beginning to detect a disturbing new trend: The rise of drug-resistant HIV strains, especially in countries such as Kenya, Zambia, Uganda, Nigeria, Tanzania and South Africa.  Like tuberculosis and other diseases, drug resistant HIV strains emerge in part because a person doesn’t take the proper dose of drugs at the right time every day. In poor regions like...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusions Patterns of disease are changing rapidly in LMICs. Pollution-related chronic diseases are becoming more common. This shift presents a particular problem for children, who are proportionately more heavily exposed than are adults to environmental pollutants and for whom these exposures are especially dangerous. Better quantification of environmental exposures and stepped-up efforts to understand how to prevent exposures that cause disease are needed in LMICs and around the globe. To confront the global problem of disease caused by pollution, improved programs of public health monitoring and environmental protecti...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Brief Communication March 2016 Source Type: research
As 2015 draws to a close, the global health community is examining the strides that have been made and how we can transform this progress into further gains across the public health spectrum. The United Nation’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2030 include SDG 3, a holistic goal for public health that aims to ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages. It is with the backdrop of this collaborative, interconnected development landscape that two important meetings take place in Japan this week. On December 16, a symposium on universal health care will bring together global leaders for a ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Organization and Delivery Public Health HIV/AIDS Japan malaria sustainable development goals TB United Nations universal health care Source Type: blogs
Ending preventable child and maternal deaths (EPCMD) by 2035 is one of US Agency for International Development’s (USAID) three global health priorities, along with creating an AIDS-Free Generation and protecting communities from infectious diseases. In June 2014 USAID launched the report Acting on the Call: Ending Preventable Maternal and Child Deaths, which provides an evidence-based approach to meeting this goal across USAID’s 24 EPCMD focus countries. One of the key elements of the EPCMD approach is alignment across interventions to meet the needs of affected populations; for this reason, Acting on the Call ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Global Health Population Health Public Health CDC Children cigarettes Environmental Health second hand smoke tobacco USAID Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Last week’s announcement of the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial results confirms what many experts have long believed — early treatment for HIV reduces illness and death. While START further establishes the vital role of early antiretroviral therapy (ART), many questions remain on how to actually bring the life-saving benefits of treatment to individual patients. In many regards, the very question over when to start treatment is unusual in the field of infectious disease. “No one says we shouldn’t treat TB [tuberculosis] until the size of your cavity is 5 centimeters ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Equity and Disparities Featured Organization and Delivery Public Health Carlos del Rio HIV Medicine Association HIV-AIDS Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment Source Type: blogs
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