What We Know About the Effect of Psychotropic Drugs on Migrant Kids

A federal judge on Monday ruled that the government must obtain parental or guardian consent before administering psychotropic drugs—those that can affect the brain or behavior—to migrant children in its care. But plenty of questions still remain about what these drugs do to young brains in the first place. “The benefits or risks of psychotropic medications to brain development are only beginning to be evaluated,” says Dr. Manpreet Singh, director of the Pediatric Mood Disorders Program at Stanford University. “We haven’t actually looked, directly and in systematic ways, at the effects of these medications beyond an acute setting.” In 2012, Singh co-authored a review of existing research on pediatric use of psychotropics, and concluded that most studies have shown either benefits or minimal effects associated with kids taking these drugs, which are commonly used to treat psychiatric symptoms including depression, anxiety, mania, psychosis and attention issues. But the paper noted that “knowledge of the long-term risks of the various interventions is very limited,” leading to “justifiable concerns” about their use in developing brains — and Singh says her assessment remains the same six years later. “What we need are more carefully designed research studies to be able to understand the biological effects of trauma, as well as other events in childhood, and how treatments such as psychotherapy, as we...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

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We examined correlates of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in adults using pooled data from epilepsy self-management studies conducted by sites in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Research Center's Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network that assessed depression severity with the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Of the 770 subjects in the analysis (mean age 42.4 ± 13.0 years), the mean total PHQ-9 score was 9.4 ± 6.6 and 334 subjects (43.4%) had moderate to severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 10). Only ongoing seizures and low education were associated wi...
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionsPalliative sedation is an alternative to alleviate end-of-life patient suffering due to refractory symptoms, particularly dyspnea and delirium, after all other treatment options have been exhausted. Decision making involves prior explanations, discussions and agreement of the team, patient, and/or family members. It can be performed in general hospital units, hospices and even at home. Midazolam is the most indicated drug, and neuroleptics may also be required in the presence of delirium. These patients’ monitoring is limited to comfort observation, relief of symptoms, and presence of adverse effects. Ther...
Source: Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
I’m a little dumb-founded whenever I run across a prescribing trend that goes against all of the available empirical evidence for common sense use of a medication. Nowhere is this more evident than with the prescription of atypical antipsychotic medications. It wouldn’t be too far a stretch to suggest that such prescriptions have become like Prozac prescriptions in the 1990s, the latest medication fad. But atypical antipsychotics, like Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate), are far more complex with far more problematic side effects than drugs like Prozac, and should only be prescribed for on-label use. The Washingto...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic General Medications Policy and Advocacy Adverse Effects Atypical Antipsychotic Bipolar Disorder Insomnia movement disorder Seroquel side effects Weight Gain Source Type: blogs
This is the 1000th presentation to my bioethics blog since starting on Google Blogspot.com in 2004.There has been many topics covered. Though comments by the visitors has always been encouraged and, since as a " discussion blog " , comments leading to discussions I have felt was the definitive function here. Virtually none of the thread topics have gone unread and most have had some commentary, some with mainly particularly strong and emphatic opinions http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2013/01/should-pathologists-be-physicians.html, some with extensive up to 12 years long continued discussion http://bioethi...
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs
Sleep is essential to the maintenance of mental health. Sleep helps to regulate mood and process emotional information and experiences into memory. Insufficient sleep is associated with increased emotional reactivity and emotional disturbance. Research indicates that REM sleep may play an especially significant role in maintaining emotional well-being and psychological balance. Sleep problems occur substantially more frequently in people with psychiatric conditions than in the general population. Often, sleep and mental health disorders exist in bi-directional relationship to each other, with each condition influencing the...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Anxiety Attention Deficit Disorder Bipolar Depression Disorders General Panic Disorder Psychology PTSD Schizophrenia Sleep Adhd Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Bipolar Disorder Emotional Disturbance emotional reactiv Source Type: news
Conclusion Evaluating the potential harms of a commonly used drug—especially a complex substance like marijuana—is a challenging but vital task. Fully informed awareness of both the potential and proven benefits and the potential and proven harms of marijuana are necessary in order to have rational discussions with patients, teens, and decision makers regarding marijuana use. Based on a review of the current literature, we suggest the mnemonic DDUMB (dependence, driving, underachievement, mental illness, and “bad to worse”) as a tool that captures several of the more well-supported, brain-based risk...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Child Adol Mental Disorders Cognition Current Issue Medical Issues Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Psychiatry Psychopharmacology Review Substance Use Disorders Cannabis dependence drug-related har Source Type: research
Among the most fascinating–and crippling–of the consequences of wheat and grains on the foolhardy humans who consume them are the brain and mind effects. The myriad forms these take are truly–can’t help it!–mind-boggling. Some recent comments shared by people on the Wheat Belly lifestyle: Lori: “Less foggy. Sleep better. More energy.” Jari: “Concentration and mood are great. I’m never upset and I’m supercalm. Energy levels up and creative as hell!” Linda: “Almost can’t believe it, but my memory is better. Also, my concentration. At almost age 60,...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle binge eating bipolar bulimia Depression eating disrorder gluten grain hunger opiates opioids paranoia schizophrenia suicidal suicide Source Type: blogs
Many of my clients ask questions during the first session like “Why is my body so tight?” or “Why can’t I sleep at night?” People want to know why their bodies react to psychological stressors such as frustration, trauma, rejection, fear, and anxiety — why all of our bodies seem programmed to respond to these as well as environmental cues, facial expressions, attitudes, and other stimuli. Pat Ogden, founder and director of the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute, and Janina Fisher, a clinical psychologist specializing in trauma, synthesize psychologica...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Abuse Book Reviews Disorders Family General Professional Psychological Assessment Psychotherapy Stress Treatment Interventions for Trauma Janina Fisher Pat Ogden Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Source Type: news
The Deadly Corruption of Clinical TrialsUpdate (4/3/2015):  After nearly 11 years of obfuscation and denial surrounding the tragic death of Dan Markingson, the University of Minnesota has suspended enrollment in psychiatric drug trials. This comes in response to a blistering report issued by the Minnesota State Legislative Auditor that cites "serious ethical issues" and vindicates much of the reporting in the story below. Read more from Carl Elliott about the fallout from the report here.IT'S NOT EASY TO WORK UP a good feeling about the institution that destroyed your life, which may be why Ma...
Source: PharmaGossip - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: blogs
If you experience depression, you will typically be prescribed an antidepressant, an SSRI or other agent. If you consult a psychologist or counselor, the underlying psychological underpinnings (if any) are explored, strategies devised to cope. But there will almost never be talk about your diet, nutritional deficiencies that amplify dark moods, the life habits that allow demons to emerge. Yet there are some very powerful strategies available that have potential to substantially lift mood. Such solutions won’t, of course, erase the effects of childhood trauma or grieving from personal loss, but they can help smooth th...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle anxiety Depression gluten grains Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
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