What We Know About the Effect of Psychotropic Drugs on Migrant Kids

A federal judge on Monday ruled that the government must obtain parental or guardian consent before administering psychotropic drugs—those that can affect the brain or behavior—to migrant children in its care. But plenty of questions still remain about what these drugs do to young brains in the first place. “The benefits or risks of psychotropic medications to brain development are only beginning to be evaluated,” says Dr. Manpreet Singh, director of the Pediatric Mood Disorders Program at Stanford University. “We haven’t actually looked, directly and in systematic ways, at the effects of these medications beyond an acute setting.” In 2012, Singh co-authored a review of existing research on pediatric use of psychotropics, and concluded that most studies have shown either benefits or minimal effects associated with kids taking these drugs, which are commonly used to treat psychiatric symptoms including depression, anxiety, mania, psychosis and attention issues. But the paper noted that “knowledge of the long-term risks of the various interventions is very limited,” leading to “justifiable concerns” about their use in developing brains — and Singh says her assessment remains the same six years later. “What we need are more carefully designed research studies to be able to understand the biological effects of trauma, as well as other events in childhood, and how treatments such as psychotherapy, as we...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

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We reported DEGs with a nominal p-value of 0.8. The network construction was created using blockwiseModules function for consideration of computer efficiency. The module detection criteria were as follows: minimum module size of 50, deepsplit of 4, and merge threshold of 0.25. The merged modules were then summarized with module eigengene (ME) correlations>0.75. MEs were defined by their first principal component and were labeled with different colors as module names in the Results section. After the modules were generated, we conducted different enrichment analysis to explore the functional interpretation of genes withi...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Rui Yan1, ShiWan Tao1, HaiYan Liu1, Yu Chen1, JiaBo Shi1, YuYin Yang1, RongXin Zhu1, ZhiJian Yao1,2* and Qing Lu3,4*1Department of Psychiatry, The Affiliated Brain Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China2Nanjing Brain Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, China3School of Biological Sciences and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, China4Child Development and Learning Science, Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education, Nanjing, ChinaBackground: Major depressive disorders often involve somatic symptoms and have been found to have fundamental differences from non-somatic depressi...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusion: Fun seeking on the BAS and frustration intolerance should be considered as targets in prevention and intervention programs for IA among adolescents with ADHD.IntroductionThe negative effects of internet addiction (IA) have become a concern in the past decades. IA is characterized by persistent internet use despite negative consequences, loss of control, preoccupation with internet use, increasing amounts of time spent online, and withdrawal symptoms (1). Internet gaming disorders are listed in the “Conditions for Further Study” section in the Fifth Edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Men...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Sleep patterns in children and adolescents were related to the psychiatric diagnosis of their parent(s). Future follow-up of these results may clarify the relations between early sleep differences and the risk of developing mood disorders in individuals at high familial risk.IntroductionSleep disturbances are core symptoms of mood disorders including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (1). Additionally, sleep problems have been associated with more severe symptoms, greater functional impairment, and increased risk for relapse among individuals with mood disorders (2). Over 40% of children and youth...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
It seems like you’ve been ill forever. For weeks, maybe months, it has felt like a major effort to do life. On a good day, you might muddle through. On not so good days, it’s hard to get out of bed, much less shower or get to work. Major mental illness has knocked you down and out. Worse, it seems like you aren’t getting any better. Hold onto the fact that long term studies have shown that most people diagnosed with even the most severe forms of mental illness at least get relief from symptoms. The NIMH Collaborative Depression Study of people diagnosed with major depression found that the recovery rate...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Medications Mental Health and Wellness Recovery Sleep Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, the studies presented in the current review demonstrate that CBD has the potential to limit delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairment and improve cognitive function in various pathological conditions. Human studies suggest that CBD may have a protective role in delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairments; however, there is limited human evidence for CBD treatment effects in pathological states (e.g. schizophrenia). In short, they found that CBD may help alleviate the negative impact of a person with schizophrenia from taking cannabis, both in the psychotic and cognitive symptoms associated with schizophrenia. T...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Disorders General Research Treatment cannabidiol Cannabis cbd cbd oil Marijuana THC Source Type: blogs
 Psychiatric medication gets a bad rap when it isn’t deserved, while simultaneously being seen by some as the end-all treatment for people living with mental illness. Our hosts both need their prescribed medication to live well, and that makes people around them ask questions ― some of which are weirder than others. Tune in to this episode to hear what they have to say.   SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW “It took me so much pride to get over that I needed psychiatric medication.” – Michelle Hammer   Highlights From ‘Meds’ Episode [1:00] What happens when Gabe and Michelle d...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Medications Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
If you experience depression, you will typically be prescribed an antidepressant, an SSRI or other agent, and have to endure the common side-effects such as weight gain, aggression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, and erectile dysfunction. If you consult a psychologist or counselor, the underlying psychological underpinnings (if any) are explored, strategies devised to cope. But there will almost never be talk about your diet, nutritional deficiencies that amplify dark moods, or the microbiome. Yet there are very powerful strategies available that have potential to substantially lift mood. Such solutions won’t, of course...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates anxiety bowel flora Depression Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation mood wheat belly Source Type: blogs
I’m a little dumb-founded whenever I run across a prescribing trend that goes against all of the available empirical evidence for common sense use of a medication. Nowhere is this more evident than with the prescription of atypical antipsychotic medications. It wouldn’t be too far a stretch to suggest that such prescriptions have become like Prozac prescriptions in the 1990s, the latest medication fad. But atypical antipsychotics, like Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate), are far more complex with far more problematic side effects than drugs like Prozac, and should only be prescribed for on-label use. The Washingto...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic General Medications Policy and Advocacy Adverse Effects Atypical Antipsychotic Bipolar Disorder Insomnia movement disorder Seroquel side effects Weight Gain Source Type: blogs
This is the 1000th presentation to my bioethics blog since starting on Google Blogspot.com in 2004.There has been many topics covered. Though comments by the visitors has always been encouraged and, since as a " discussion blog " , comments leading to discussions I have felt was the definitive function here. Virtually none of the thread topics have gone unread and most have had some commentary, some with mainly particularly strong and emphatic opinions http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2013/01/should-pathologists-be-physicians.html, some with extensive up to 12 years long continued discussion http://bioethi...
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs
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