The Most Damaging Myths about Motherhood

You should be able to get pregnant right away. It’s what women’s bodies are designed to do. You should love being pregnant—or at least embrace it. After all, you’re growing a child! Pregnancy is when you get to enjoy all those feel-good hormones flowing through your body—and after you give birth, you should be thrilled to hold that baby in your arms. You’re supposed to instinctively bond with your newborn, and know exactly what they need. There’s a right way to give birth—and it doesn’t involve an epidural or a hospital. Myths about motherhood are so powerful, so prevalent and so salient that they start well before we even become moms, according to Emma Basch, Psy.D, a psychologist who specializes in treating postpartum depression and other perinatal mood and anxiety disorders in Washington, D.C. And these myths show up everywhere. We hear them from well-meaning loved ones and strangers. We see them on social media. We come across them in clever headlines on all sorts of sites, inside all sorts of publications. And we consume these myths, and we assume them as our own beliefs. And we inevitably feel terrible, inadequate and lacking when we don’t act accordingly. We inevitably feel like we’re deeply, deeply flawed, and we’re missing some significant maternal gene. We also don’t try to dispute them. Which means we don’t see facts like—10 percent of women in the U.S. have difficulty getting...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Family Friends General Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Esteem Self-Help Stress Women's Issues Motherhood Pregnancy Stigma Source Type: blogs

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Abstract Psychosocial aspects of fertility, infertility, and assisted reproductive technology (ART) can significantly impact patients' sense of self-identity and personal agency, mental well-being, sexual and marital relationships, reproductive efficiency, compliance with treatment, and pregnancy outcomes. Research is needed to understand how stress, anxiety, depression, mood disorders, and psychotropic medications impact fertility and infertility treatment. The psychosocial implications of ART on our society include a shift toward older maternal age at conception, the complexities of third-party reproduction, and...
Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of prenatal anxiety and depression status was very common during pregnancy among pregnant women. Lower educational level and more physical occupations were associated with higher prevalence of anxiety and depression status. PMID: 30092662 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: J Reprod Infant Psychol Source Type: research
Research presented at an American Psychological Association convention says about 10 per cent of new fathers experience depression and anxiety — and that postpartum symptoms are about much more than pregnancy hormones.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
Research presented at an American Psychological Association convention says about 10 per cent of new fathers experience depression and anxiety — and that postpartum symptoms are about much more than pregnancy hormones.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
Research presented at an American Psychological Association convention says about 10 per cent of new fathers experience depression and anxiety — and that postpartum symptoms are about much more than pregnancy hormones.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
Adapting to drastic changes in the biological, psychological, and social domains during pregnancy and postpartum periods increases the risk of psychological difficulties, including depression and anxiety, in women (O'Hara  and Wisner, 2014). Transitioning to fatherhood may also cause stress in men throughout the perinatal period (Garfield et al., 2006), thus leading to depression and anxiety, with patterns similar to those observed in women (Teixeira et al., 2009; Wang and Chen, 2006). Whereas depression affects 17.2% of women during pregnancy and 13.1% during postpartum periods (Underwood et&...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research paper Source Type: research
Mental illness is common prenatally and postpartum, with up to 25% of women experiencing a pathological level of stress, anxiety, and/or depression during the perinatal period (Kingston  et al., 2012). Mental illness during and after pregnancy can impact the fetus and child, with effects including lower Apgar scores in newborns, increased emotional problems, and risk for mental health difficulties in children and adolescents (Stein et al., 2014). Prenatal anxiety disorders spec ifically increase the likelihood of premature birth and low birthweight infants (Rondo et al., 2003; Wadhwa et al., 1...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review article Source Type: research
Anxiety disorders in the peripartum period are common and frequently overlooked. They can present de novo or as exacerbations of generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder, or posttraumatic stress disorder. Calculating a score on the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale is a useful method of screening for these disorders while also screening for perinatal depression. Treatment includes psychotherapy, specifically cognitive behavioral therapy, and antidepressants, the choice of which should be balanced between the severity of symptoms and impact of functioning, ri...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Psychosocial aspects of fertility, infertility, and assisted reproductive technology (ART) can significantly impact patients ’ sense of self-identity and personal agency, mental well-being, sexual and marital relationships, reproductive efficiency, compliance with treatment, and pregnancy outcomes. Research is needed to understand how stress, anxiety, depression, mood disorders, and psychotropic medications impact ferti lity and infertility treatment. The psychosocial implications of ART on our society include a shift toward older maternal age at conception, the complexities of third-party reproduction, and considera...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Omega-3 fatty acids are found primarily in fish oil and certain marine algae. Because depression appears less common in nations where people eat large amounts of fish, scientists have investigated whether fish oils may prevent and/or treat depression and other mood disorders. Two omega-3 fatty acids — eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) — are thought to have the most potential to benefit people with mood disorders. How might omega-3s improve depression? Different mechanisms of action have been proposed. For example, omega-3s can easily travel through the brain cell membrane and interact w...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Depression Behavioral Health Drugs and Supplements Mental Health Source Type: blogs
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