Heat exhaustion symptoms: Headache? Signs the heatwave is making you unwell

HEAT exhaustion symptoms and signs may be caused by hot temperatures, or doing strenuous physical activity. While the condition itself is not usually dangerous, it can lead to the life-threatening condition heat stroke if not treated properly. Watch out for these eight symptoms of heat exhaustion during this summer ’s heatwave.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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​Heat-related illness should be an easy diagnosis, but it is not that simple, and there are a number of tripwires.The common pathophysiology for most heat-related illnesses is heat generated from muscular activity that accumulates faster than can be dissipated via increased skin blood flow and sweating, resulting in exertional hyperthermia. Part of the challenge for clinicians is that heat illness is a continuum with a significant overlap of signs and symptoms. Granted, heat rash, heat cramps, and heat edema aren't that confusing, but diagnostic accuracy can be a little more challenging at the other end of the spectrum.S...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
The summer season is waning but we’re not done with the heat. Hot and humid weather can bring a host of heat-related problems: heat cramps, heat rash, heat exhaustion, heat stroke…. It’s helpful to be aware of these issues, especially as we experience changes in the climate with humidity or rising temperatures. There have been several studies which have documented an uptick in emergency department visits and hospital admissions for conditions like dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, and other types of heat related illness during times of high heat. Persons who are particularly at risk are the very ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Environmental health Safety Source Type: blogs
Large swaths of the country are gearing up for — or already weathering — a major heat wave this week, with temperatures threatening to top 100 degrees in some places. If you live in an area experiencing these extreme temperatures, it’s important to know how to keep yourself cool and healthy. Here’s what you need to know in a heat wave, according to Dr. Laura Burke, an emergency medicine physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Prevention is the best medicine Burke recommends limiting strenuous outdoor activity and taking frequent breaks if it can’t be avoided, staying indoo...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
Temperatures were in the 100s when Vanessa Dunn, a 29-year-old Los Angeles-based makeup artist, was driving back home to California from Virginia last summer. After hours on the road and drinking limited water, she was struck by a severe case of dehydration and heat stroke. ”I wasn’t drinking enough water because I didn’t want to stop to pee,” she says. When she finally pulled over for the night she felt light-headed, and she couldn’t keep food down when she tried to eat. She even threw up blood. ”I was in incredible pain, and dizzy,” she says. “[I went] to the ER, turned out...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Conclusion The study showed that artificially stimulating sweat glands in a tattooed area of skin in 10 men produced a lower sweat rate than stimulating sweat glands in a non-tattooed area of skin in the same person. The authors suggest a number of possible explanations for this, including that it may be because tattooing skin starts an inflammatory response that may cause damage to normal tissue including sweat glands. However, these are only theories and need to be investigated further. While this is interesting preliminary research, there are some important things to remember: There were only 10 male participants invo...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news
For Teen Vogue, by Brittney McNamara. Photo: Getty Images Temperatures in some states are going to hit 120 degrees. This summer, some parts of the country could get so hot that not even a pool party will cool you down. In fact, the weekend will bring dangerous temperatures to the western part of the country, spiking thermometers to record highs in places like Arizona and Southern California, ABC News reports. Meteorologists are predicting temperatures as high as 118 degrees in Phoenix, Arizona, creeping up to 119 degrees on Monday. In Death Valley, California, temperatures are expected to hit 120 next week, while Las ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The objective of this study was to obtain further information about the health status and health needs of IDP women and children, aged 15 and under, living in the informal settlements in central Iraq. The study was conducted between February and June 2015. Our focus was on settlements in Baghdad, Karbala and Kirkuk, which between them hosted an estimated 688,944 IDPs, about a third of Iraq’s IDPs.14 This estimate is undoubtedly low as some IDPs were not counted or registered. It is the hope that information from this study will help improve access to services for this vulnerable population. These governorates were ...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract Thermoregulation is a vital function of the autonomic nervous system in response to cold and heat stress. Thermoregulatory physiology sustains health by keeping body core temperature within a degree or two of 37°C, which enables normal cellular function. Heat production and dissipation are dependent on a coordinated set of autonomic responses. The clinical detection of thermoregulatory impairment provides important diagnostic and localizing information in the evaluation of disorders that impair thermoregulatory pathways, including autonomic neuropathies and ganglionopathies. Failure of neural thermore...
Source: Autonomic Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Auton Neurosci Source Type: research
Heat stroke caused by persistent heat exposure is characterized by the following symptoms: reduced blood pressure and blood volume, lethargy, confusion, headache, thirst, and hyperventilation due to loss of excess fluids and salts. The early management of this condition is critical to preventing a fatal outcome [1].
Source: Journal of Infection and Public Health - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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