Pharmacotherapy and nutritional supplements for seasonal affective disorders: a systematic review.

Pharmacotherapy and nutritional supplements for seasonal affective disorders: a systematic review. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2018 Jul 26;:1-13 Authors: Cools O, Hebbrecht K, Coppens V, Roosens L, De Witte A, Morrens M, Neels H, Sabbe B Abstract INTRODUCTION: A seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a subtype of unipolar and bipolar major depressive disorders. It is characterized by its annual recurrence of depressive episodes at a particular season, mostly seen in winter and is responsible for 10-20% of the prevalence of major depressive disorders. Some pathophysiological hypotheses, such as the phase delay and the monoamine depletion hypotheses, have been postulated but the exact cause has not been fully unraveled yet. Studies on treatment for SAD in the last decade are lacking. To tackle this chronic disease, attention needs to be drawn to the gaps in this research field. Areas covered: In this systematic review, the authors give a broad overview of the pharmacological therapy available for SAD. Also, nutritional substances fitting well with the postulated hypotheses are reviewed for the treatment and prevention of SAD. There is a specific focus on the quality of the currently performed studies. Expert opinion: Light therapy and fluoxetine are the only proven and effective acute treatment options for SAD, while bupropion is the only registered drug for prevention of SAD. This area of research is in dire need of valid large-scale and sufficiently reproduci...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research

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The use of light for its antidepressant action dates back to the  beginnings of civilization. As early as 4700 y ago, Wong Tai mentioned the fluctuation of diseases with seasons, Hippocrates wrote on the interrelation between seasonal climates and mood (melancholia and mania) [1], and Aretaeus of Cappadocia prescribed, in the second century AD, that “Lethargi cs be laid in the light, and exposed to the rays of the sun, for the disease is gloom”. While being reported for millennia, bright light therapy (BLT) in depression was not officially recognized until 30 y ago for treating the Seasonal Affec...
Source: Sleep Medicine Reviews - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
The use of light for its antidepressant action dates back to the beginnings of civilization. As early as 4700 years ago, Wong Tai mentioned the fluctuation of diseases with seasons, Hippocrates wrote on the interrelation between seasonal climates and mood (melancholia and mania) [1], and Aretaeus of Cappadocia prescribed, in the second century AD, that “Lethargics be laid in the light, and exposed to the rays of the sun, for the disease is gloom”. While being reported for millennia, bright light therapy (BLT) in depression was not officially recognized until 30 years ago for treating the Seasonal Affective Diso...
Source: Sleep Medicine Reviews - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
Our society tends to dismiss seasonal affective disorder (SAD). We minimize it. We misunderstand it. Oh, you just don’t like winter. And who could blame you? Winter is tough on everyone. Oh, SAD is like the winter blues, right? You get grumpy or moody because you hate the freezing cold. You’re just in a funk. It happens to a lot of people. It’s totally normal. How can you feel depressed when the air is so crisp and it’s a winter wonderland out there? We incorporate SAD into our vocabulary, flippantly using it in conversation. “Similar to someone saying “I can’t make up my mind, it...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Depression Disorders General Seasonal Affective Disorder Stigma Light therapy Mental Health Stigma phototherapy SAD summer depression summertime depression winter depression wintertime depression Source Type: news
For 30 years, bright light therapy (BLT) has been considered as an effective, well-tolerated treatment for seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Because of low response rates, new treatment strategies are needed for bipolar depression (BD), which resembles SAD in certain respects. Few placebo-controlled studies of BLT efficacy have been carried out for BD. Accordingly, this study evaluates the efficacy and safety of BLT as an add-on treatment for BD. Thirty-two BD outpatients were randomly assigned to BLT (10000 lx) or dim light (DL,
Source: Psychiatry Research - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
It’s that time of year again when the highly sensitive types among us who thrive with lots of sunlight begin to wither with the plants as the sun begins to hide. Not only do we get less vitamin D (and deficiencies have been linked to depression), but the change in sunlight affects our circadian rhythm — the body’s internal biological clock that governs certain brain activity and hormone production. In some people, the change of mood-related chemicals can cause seasonal affective disorder (SAD), also known as winter blues or seasonal depression. For an episode of major depression to be class...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Bipolar Depression Holiday Coping Mental Health and Wellness Roundup Self-Help Light therapy Sad Sadness Seasonal Affective Disorder Seasonal Depression seasonal depressive disorder Vitamin Source Type: blogs
By Christian Jarrett The clocks have gone back and there’s a chill in the air. It’s well known that during these darker months, a significant minority of us experience unwelcome negative changes to our mood (at least if you believe in the notion of Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD, which not all experts do). Now an intriguing study in Psychiatry Research has explored the link this condition may have with another psychiatric diagnosis, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The results suggest that people with OCD are more likely than average to experience seasonal effects on their mood, and that for these ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental health Source Type: blogs
Happy Saturday, sweet readers! It’s a gorgeous day here in my neck of the woods, and trust me when I say we’ll be taking full advantage of it! After all, the days are getting shorter and soon there won’t be as many warm and sunny days (at least, not here) until spring. Many people begin experiencing seasonal affective disorder (SAD) as fall really kicks in. As many of you know, for a lot of people light therapy is an effective way to treat SAD. However, did you also know light therapy might be able to help with bipolar disorder? That’s just one of the topics we’re covering in today’s Psy...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Brain and Behavior Celebrities Disorders Industrial and Workplace Policy and Advocacy Professional Psychology Around the Net Research Self-Esteem Stigma Treatment Bipolar Disorder Defense Mechanism Denial Depression Source Type: blogs
Bright light therapy (BLT) is an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder and non- seasonal depression. The efficacy of BLT in treating patients with bipolar disorder is still unknown.
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research paper Source Type: research
Light therapy (LT) has been widely used in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder. Recently some evidence indicated that LT may play a role in bipolar depression, either as monotherapy or in combination with total sleep deprivation (TSD). However, the studies examining the treatment effect of LT in bipolar depression resulted in inconsistent findings. To clarify the role of LT in the disorder, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare the efficacy of LT in the treatment of bipolar depression.
Source: European Neuropsychopharmacology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Source Type: research
This article looks at interventions that are helpful for those suffering wintertime SAD. If the darker days put you into a darker mood, there are several interrelated things you can do to help yourself: Bundle up and go outside. Yes, go outside where it may be cold and windy. There are a number of studies that show that an hour a day of exposure to the sun’s rays do much to reduce the symptoms of SAD. Why? Because exposure to sunlight helps your body regulate the production of melatonin, the hormone that helps people sleep. More melatonin is produced when there is less sun, making you sleepy. More sun can result in ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Cognitive-Behavioral Depression Diet & Nutrition Disorders General Healthy Living Psychology Psychotherapy Seasonal Affective Disorder Self-Help Sleep Bipolar Disorder Caffeine Circadian rhythm Circadian Rhythms Hypomania I Source Type: news
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