Altered neural responsivity to food cues in relation to food preferences, but not appetite-related hormone concentrations after RYGB-surgery.

CONCLUSIONS: RYGB leads to changed responsivity of the frontoparietal control network that orchestrates top-down control to high-energy food compared to low-energy food and non-food cues, rather than in reward related brain regions, in a satiated state. Together with correlations with the shift in food preference from high- to low-energy foods this indicates a possible role in new food preference formation. PMID: 30041007 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Behavioural Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Brain Res Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 20 September 2019Source: The American Journal of SurgeryAuthor(s): Tripurari Mishra, Jacob B. Shapiro, Luis Ramirez, Kara J. Kallies, Shanu N. Kothari, Thomas A. LonderganAbstractIntroductionLaparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is known to increase risk for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis due to hyperoxaluria; however, nephrolithiasis rates after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) are not well described. Our objective was to determine the rate of nephrolithiasis after LRYGB versus LSG.MethodsThe electronic medical records of patients who underwent LRYGB or LSG between 2001-201...
Source: The American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Journal of Laparoendoscopic&Advanced Surgical Techniques, Ahead of Print.
Source: Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is known to increase risk for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis due to hyperoxaluria; however, nephrolithiasis rates after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) are not well described. Our objective was to determine the rate of nephrolithiasis after LRYGB versus LSG.
Source: American Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
With the advent of the obesity epidemic and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB) has emerged and remained one of the most effective and common bariatric operations of the past two decades [1-4]. There was a time during the evolution of this procedure when the sheer excitement of completing such a highly complex procedure laparoscopically offered some surgeons a license to cut corners in the name of efficiency. After all, the mantra of “economy of motion” was taught to many of us by those very pioneers who advanced the technical elements of the operation.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
I would like to congratulate Pechman DM, et al. on their contribution to the pertinent area of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. Many articles have outlined the safety of both Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy in geriatric patients. Here, the authors use American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) data to estimate the morbidity and mortality in patients over the age of 70 who had bariatric surgery.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
There are few publications on revising the Sleeve Gastrectomy (SG) to One Anastomosis Gastric Bypass (OAGB).
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
The Single Anastomosis Duodenal Ileostomy with Sleeve Gastrectomy (SADI-S) is gaining popularity in the United States as an alternative to the Gastric Bypass for patients with a high BMI or who are less likely to succeed with a sleeve. While SADI-S has similar weight loss to the GBP, the complication rate is significantly lower allowing surgeons to perform SADI-S in an ambulatory surgical center with a 23 hour stay.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
Several studies have demonstrated minorities and Hispanic ethnicities have disproportionally greater burden of morbid obesity in the United States. However, the majority of bariatric procedures are performed in the non-Hispanic white population.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) prevalence is rising worldwide, as a direct consequence of the obesity epidemic. Bariatric Surgery provides proven NAFLD amelioration, although questions remain if Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) or Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) is more effective. To answer this question, we conducted a Systematic review and meta-analysis exclusively comparing RYGB against LSG for amelioration of NAFLD using four separate criteria: ALT, AST, NAFLD activity score (NAS), and NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS).
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Review articles Source Type: research
We present the first case of bariatric surgery in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and outline management challenges in the context of the relevant literature. A 56-year-old man with type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and a body mass index of 41.8 kg/m2 was referred to the bariatric centre of the Churchill Hospital, Oxford, for consideration of surgery for morbid obesity. His comorbidity included type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obstructive sleep apnoea. He underwent a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. His initial recovery was uneventful and he was discharged on the first postoperative day. Six weeks ...
Source: Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann R Coll Surg Engl Source Type: research
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