What happened to the first wheat eaters?

  In the first Wheat Belly book, I recounted the history of wheat from its wild-growing 14-chromosome einkorn ancestor, to the 28-chromosome emmer of Biblical times, to 42-chromosome spelt and other Triticum species, and finally to high-yield semi-dwarf strains created by agricultural scientists in the 1960s now comprises 99% of all wheat products sold. The quantity of additional changes introduced since are many, including selection of strains enriched in wheat germ agglutinin and phytates for their pest-resistant properties (while increasing human toxicity), gliadin and glutenin for desirable baking characteristics (but with amplified celiac, autoimmune, and opioid properties), and genetically-altered strains obtained via chemical mutagenesis to generate herbicide resistance (introducing myriad changes in proteins, including new allergens). Modern wheat that graces your breakfast bowl, dinner table, or snack tray is therefore completely unlike traditional or heirloom strains of even a century ago. Because the first Wheat Belly book emphasized the toxic properties of modern wheat (along with my experiment comparing bread made from einkorn wheat versus that made from modern wheat), some people interpreted this to mean that consumption of, say, emmer, Kamut, or Red Fife wheat was therefore good. Not so. It is simply less harmful. (Remember: less bad is not necessarily good.) What happened to the first humans in the Fertile Crescent who harvested wild, then cultivated, whe...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates gluten gluten-free grain-free grains health Inflammation wheat wheat belly Source Type: blogs

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