High blood pressure may threaten the aging brain

New research suggests that high blood pressure ​ later in life may contribute to blood vessel blockages and tangles linked to Alzheimer's disease​
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of serum telomere repeat binding factor 1 (TRF1) and TRF2 in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their correlation with clinicopathological features. METHODS: Fifty AD subjects and 50 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the expression of TRF1 and TRF2 in the peripheral blood plasma. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between the protein expression and AD clinical parameters. RESULTS: The expression of TRF1 in peripheral blood serum of AD patients was s...
Source: Neurological Research - Category: Neurology Tags: Neurol Res Source Type: research
This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
Authors: Stepler KE, Robinson RAS Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) disproportionately affects African Americans (AAs) and Hispanics, who are more likely to have AD than non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) and Asian Americans. Racial disparities in AD are multifactorial, with potential contributing factors including genetics, comorbidities, diet and lifestyle, education, healthcare access, and socioeconomic status. Interestingly, comorbidities such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease also impact AAs. It is plausible that a common underlying molecular basis to these higher incidences of AD a...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Data from a large human trial has shown that control of blood pressure in older individuals, achieved through lifestyle changes and medication, reduces the risk of mild cognitive impairment by 20% or so, but not the risk of dementia. This is a nuanced result; given what is known of the way in which blood pressure interacts unfavorably with a range of mechanisms related to the development of dementia, it is certainly easier to blame the study design, as the authors do here. There is plenty of evidence to show that hypertension damages the brain directly, causing a greater incidence of ruptured capillaries and tiny areas of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Frailty is a consequence of advanced aging, a categorization applied to an individual who is greatly physically weakened by the accumulation of cell and tissue damage and its many downstream consequences. Frailty is generally described as some combination of the loss of muscle mass and strength known as sarcopenia, fragility of bones caused by osteoporosis, and a faltering immune system that no longer adequately protects against pathogens, coupled with outcomes such as weakness, exhaustion, and weight loss. The underlying root causes of frailty are also the causes of other age-related conditions, and it is thus expected to...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
I missed the open access paper noted here when it appeared last year. It is an interesting addition to the growing body of evidence that shows drainage of cerebrospinal fluid from the brain to be an important mechanism for clearance of metabolic waste. That the drainage paths become impaired with age contributes to the aggregation of proteins such as amyloid-β, involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Thus approaches to restore drainage in one way or another should prove quite effective for a range of neurodegenerative conditions. We will find out whether or not this is the case over the next few years as g...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
This study is in line with where the field of dementia research is going: preventing memory loss earlier,” said Laurie Ryan, chief of the Dementias of Aging Branch in the National Institute of Aging and contributor to the clinical trial. “Much like we have research-based interventions for heart health and cancer prevention, we hope to have guidance based on this and subsequent studies that will more definitively show how to slow or even stop dementia well before symptoms appear.” James Pickett, head of research at Alzheimer’s Society in the UK, said researchers have known for a while that keeping bl...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease CNN Dementia Source Type: news
A new study looks at the link between blood pressure and the risks of developing Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. One in three American adults have high blood pressure, but only half have it under control. Dr. Tara Narula reports.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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