Borreliosis in Sport Horse Practice

Given the variable clinical signs attributed to Borrelia burgdorferi, including infectious arthritis, neurologic disease, and behavioral changes, B burgdorferi is an important differential for decreased performance in sport horses. The primary vectors (Ixodes tick species) are expanding their range and thus Borrelia species are located in a wider area, making exposure more likely. Due to regionally high seroprevalence and vague clinical signs, diagnosis of Lyme disease in the horse is believed overestimated. Antibiotics are first-line treatment of confirmed Lyme disease. A single positive serologic test, by itself, is not conformation of Lyme disease but is evidence of current or past infection.
Source: Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Source Type: research

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Abstract Lyme disease (borreliosis) is a tick-borne bacterial infection caused by the spirochaete Borrelia burgdoferi, transmitted by hard-backed Ixodes ticks. Actual numbers of cases are increasing and it appears that the distribution across the UK is widening; however, it occurs most frequently in area of woodland, with temperate climate. It typically presents in mid to late summer. Lyme disease is a multisystem disease. The nervous system is the second most commonly affected system after the skin. Other systemic manifestations, such as carditis, keratitis, uveitis and inflammatory arthritis, rarely occur in Eur...
Source: Practical Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Pract Neurol Source Type: research
Cellular Microbiology,Volume 0, Issue ja, -Not available-.
Source: Cellular Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Source Type: research
As Lyme disease and Lyme arthritis spread to new regions in North America, physicians may ned to become aware of their signs and symptoms. Allen C. Steere, MD, says “Lyme arthritis is more complicated to treat than other manifestations of the disease.” Here are some best practices for treating Lyme arthritis...
Source: The Rheumatologist - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Conditions best practices Borrelia burgdorferi Lyme arthritis Lyme Disease Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides insights into the alteration of the plasma phospholipid profile of LA patients, resulting from Borrelia burgdorferi infection, that may lead to improved LA diagnosis and differentiation of this disease from RA. Furthermore, LPE (14:0) was found to have a high potential to be a possible biomarker of LA. PMID: 30059653 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Arch Biochem Biophys Source Type: research
Host genotype influences the severity of murine Lyme borreliosis, caused by the spirochetal bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. C57BL/6 (B6) mice develop mild Lyme arthritis, whereas C3H/HeN (C3H) mice develop severe Lyme arthritis. Differential expression of interleukin 10 (IL-10) has long been associated with mouse strain differences in Lyme pathogenesis; however, the underlying mechanism(s) of this genotype-specific IL-10 regulation remained elusive. Herein we reveal a cAMP-mediated mechanism of IL-10 regulation in B6 macrophages that is substantially diminished in C3H macrophages. Under cAMP and CD14-p38 mitogen-activated ...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Cellular Microbiology: Pathogen-Host Cell Molecular Interactions Source Type: research
In the present study, we sought to evaluate the feasibility of targeting vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) by positron emission tomography (PET) for the longitudinal quantitative assessment of Borrelia burgdorf...
Source: Arthritis Research and Therapy - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Abstract The spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferisensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne disease in Europe and the United States. The spirochetes can be transmitted to humans via ticks, and then spread to different tissues, leading to arthritis, carditis and neuroborreliosis. Although antibiotics have commonly been used to treat infected individuals, some treated patients do not respond to antibiotics and experience persistent, long-term arthritis. Thus, there is a need to investigate alternative therapeutics against Lyme disease. The spirochete bacterium colonization i...
Source: Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Microbiology Source Type: research
is the most common tick-borne illness in the USA and Europe. Pathogens involved are Borrelia burgdorferi in the USA and B. afzelii and B. garinii in Europe. The characteristic rash of erythema migrans occurs in approximately 75% of patients. Neurological disease, including facial palsy, meningoencephalitis, aseptic meningitis and polyradiculopathy, occurs in 10 –15%. Cardiac disease, primarily manifest as heart block, is seen in 1–2%. Arthritis is seen as a late complication in about 30%.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Bacterial infections Source Type: research
In this study, we show that mAb blockade revealed a unique role for IFN-β in Lyme arthritis development in B6.C3-Bbaa1 mice. Genetic control of IFN-β expression was also identified in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with B. burgdorferi, and it was responsible for feed-forward amplification of IFN-stimulated genes. Reciprocal radiation chimeras between B6.C3-Bbaa1 and C57BL/6 mice revealed that arthritis is initiated by radiation-sensitive cells, but orchestrated by radiation-resistant components of joint tissue. Advanced congenic lines were developed to reduce the physical size of the Bbaa1 interval, a...
Source: Journal of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: J Immunol Source Type: research
We report an atypical case of European LCLB, suggesting that ACA is not the only possible presentation of LCLB. The diagnosis of ACA is often clinically missed for months or years, and may be mistaken at the inflammation phase for vascular disorders, erysipelas or bursitis/arthritis, and at the atrophic phase for lichen sclerosus atrophicus, morphoea or anetoderma. To our knowledge, no such tumorous LCLB has previously been described.
Source: British Journal of Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Case Report: Clinical and Diagnostic Source Type: research
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