Russian Company Brands Asbestos with Trump ’ s Face

The world’s largest producer of chrysotile asbestos is now marketing its signature product with President Donald Trump’s image, according to a recent Facebook post from the Russian mining company Uralasbest. On June 25, the company, which operates a giant asbestos mine in the Ural Mountains in Western Russia, posted photos of its asbestos on palettes wrapped in plastic and stamped with a seal of Trump’s face in red ink. A message of support for Trump and former Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt accompanied the photos. In an English translation provided by the Environmental Working Group, the Russian mining company praised Trump for his outspoken support of asbestos. A loose translation generated by Facebook backs that interpretation. “Donald is on our side! … He supported the head of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, who stated that his agency would no longer deal with negative effects potentially derived from products containing asbestos. Donald Trump supported a specialist and called asbestos ‘100% safe after application,’” the translated post reads. Before resigning as the head of the EPA last week, Pruitt led a push to exclude legacy uses of asbestos from the upcoming evaluation of the toxic mineral under the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act. Asbestos, known for its durability and resistance to heat, was used extensively in the U.S...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news

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Authors: Charytoniuk T, Małyszko M, Bączek J, Fiedorczyk P, Siedlaczek K, Małyszko J Abstract Nephrectomy, which constitutes a gold-standard procedure for the treatment of renal-cell carcinoma (RCC), has been widely discussed in the past decade as a significant risk factor of the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). RCC is the third most common genitourinary cancer in the United States, with an estimated more than 65,000 new cases and 14,970 deaths. The aim of this review was to precisely and comprehensively summarize the status of current knowledge in chronic kidney disease risk factors after nephrectom...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
Authors: Russo Picasso MF, Vicens J, Giuliani C, Jaén ADV, Cabezón C, Figari M, Gómez Saldaño AM, Figar S Abstract Background: Two hypotheses attempt to explain the increase of thyroid cancer (TC) incidence: overdetection by excessive diagnostic scrutiny and a true increase in new cases brought about by environmental factors. Changes in the mechanism of detection and the risk of incidentally diagnosed TC could result in an increase of TC incidence. Methods: Retrospective cohort study. We identified incident cases of TC from the pathological reports of patients in a HMO and review of ...
Source: Journal of Cancer Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: J Cancer Epidemiol Source Type: research
Contributors : Ting La ; Xu D ZhangSeries Type : Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Mus musculusTo investigate miRNAs in quiescent cancer cell
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencing Mus musculus Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- Also, breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy?
Source: MedPage Today OB/GYN - Category: OBGYN Source Type: news
Deaths attributed to asbestos exposure — within the United States and worldwide — have been significantly underestimated, according to the latest study by the International Commission of Occupational Health (ICOH). Asbestos is killing more people than anyone thought. Based on the most extensive study to date, occupational asbestos-related diseases killed 39,275 people within the U.S. and 222,321 people throughout the world in 2016. Both figures were more than double the commonly used estimates that stem from various governmental and nongovernmental health agencies. “The asbestos burden is worse than peopl...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
By Stacy Simon The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 2 decades, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. The cancer death rate for men and women combined fell 25% from its peak in 1991 to 2014, the most recent year for which data are available. This decline translates to more than 2.1 million deaths averted during this time period. “Cancer Statistics, 2017,” published in the American Cancer Society’s journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the US this year. The estimat...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news
Abstract Previous occupational asbestos exposure (more rarely environmental or domestic exposure) may induce various pleural and/or pulmonary, benign or malignant diseases, sometimes with a very long latency for malignant mesothelioma (MM). Asbestos has been widely extracted and used in Western countries and in emerging or developing countries, resulting in a peak of MM incidence in France around 2020 and likely in a world pandemic of asbestos-induced diseases. These patients have mostly benign respiratory diseases (pleural plugs) but may also be diagnosed with lung cancer or malignant pleural mesothelioma, a...
Source: Presse Medicale - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Presse Med Source Type: research
Conclusion - the need for a global health approach Asbestos and ARD have emerged as global health issues. All countries with a history of asbestos use are experiencing an epidemic of ARD, with the stage of the epidemic being a function of the country’s past asbestos use, whether and when it implemented a ban, and, if no ban is in place, at what levels it continues to use the material. Gaps in human capital and technology available to countries warrant international cooperation. The expansion of national bans in industrializing countries and reducing the burden of ARD in industrialized countries are the short-term targets...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur study supports the association of exposure to asbestos with an increased risk of laryngeal cancer mortality among male workers. Level of EvidenceNA Laryngoscope, 2015
Source: The Laryngoscope - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Laryngology Source Type: research
Publication date: 20 July 2015 Source:Clinica Chimica Acta, Volume 447 Author(s): Bin Wei , Chunmei Guo , Shuqing Liu , Ming-Zhong Sun Annexin A4 (Anxa4) is one of the Ca2+-regulated and phospholipid-binding annexin superfamily proteins. Anxa4 has a potential role in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of certain cancers. Studies indicate that Anxa4 up-regulation promotes the progression of tumor and chemoresistance of colorectal cancer (CRC), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), endometrial carcinoma (EC), gastric cancer (GC), chemoresistant lung cancer (LC), malignant mesothelioma (MM), renal cell carcinoma (RCC)...
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
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