Pre-Injection of Small Interfering RNA (siRNA) Promotes c-Jun Gene Silencing and Decreases the Survival Rate of Axotomy-Injured Spinal Motoneurons in Adult Mice

AbstractBrachial plexus injury is a common clinical peripheral nerve trauma. A series of genes in motoneurons were activated in the corresponding segments of the spinal cord after brachial plexus roots axotomy. The spatial and temporal expression of these genes directly affects the speed of motoneuron axon regeneration and precise target organ reinnervation. In a previous study, we observed the overexpression of c-Jun in motoneurons of the spinal cord ventral horn after brachial plexus injury in rats. However, the relevance of c-Jun expression with respect to the fate of axotomy-induced branchial plexus injury in adult mice remains unknown. In the present study, we explored the function of c-Jun in motoneuron recovery after axotomy. We pre-injected small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knockdown c-Jun expression in mice and examined the effects of the overexpression of c-Jun in motoneurons after the axotomy of the brachial plexus in vivo. Axotomy induced c-Jun overexpression in the ventral horn motoneurons of adult mice from 3 to 14  days after injury. In addition, the pre-injection of siRNA transiently inhibited c-Jun expression and decreased the survival rate of axotomy-injured motoneurons. These findings indicate that the axotomy-induced overexpression of c-Jun plays an important role in the survival of ventral horn motoneu rons in adult mice. In addition, the pre-injection of c-Jun siRNA through the brachial plexus stem effectively adjusts c-Jun gene expression at the ips...
Source: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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ConclusionCell transplantation appears to be a safe therapeutic strategy possessing substantial beneficial effects in the patients with SCI in clinic. Moreover, treating SCI with stem cell, the dosage of cells between 1 –5 × 107 and 10 –20 × 107, in intermediate or chronic phase, minimally invasive techniques, may bring more advantage to SCI patient.Graphical abstractThese slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.
Source: European Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Authors: Ren ZW, Zhou JG, Xiong ZK, Zhu FZ, Guo XD Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the recovery effect of exosomes derived from micro ribonucleic acid (miR)-133b-modified adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on neurological function after spinal cord injury (SCI) and its mechanism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The SCI model of rats was used and divided into the following 5 groups: sham-operation group, 4 d SCI group, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) group, miR-control group and miR-133b group. At 96 h after operation, rats were euthanatized, and spinal tissues were removed. Next, the level of miR-133b was detected vi...
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: MiR-152 could inhibit inflammatory responses and promote the recovery of the spinal cord injury through the c-jun N-terminal kinase pathway and it can be a target molecular for treating spinal cord injury. PMID: 30657545 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Overexpressed miR-219-5p promotes SCI recovery and motor function elevation via alleviating NEUROD2-regulated inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID: 30657544 [PubMed - in process]
Source: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 January 2019Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Chan Sol Park, Jee Youn Lee, Hae Young Choi, Bong Gun Ju, Inchan Youn, Tae Young YuneAbstractAfter spinal cord injury (SCI), blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption and hemorrhage lead to blood cell infiltration and progressive secondary injuries including inflammation. Inflammatory response is one of the major events resulting in apoptosis, scar formation and neuronal dysfunction after SCI. Here, we investigated whether protocatechuic acid (PCA), a natural phenolic compound, would attenuate BSCB disruption and hemorrhage, ...
Source: Neurochemistry International - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
This study demonstrated that trauma patients may experience multiple complications that are of relevance to the consulting physiatrist.
Source: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Editorials Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: In this study, oxymetazoline gel presented a clear clinical beneficial effect accompanied by a favorable safety and tolerability profile. Results of the pharmacokinetic analysis indicate that the clinical benefit was mainly due to a local effect of oxymetazoline. Future studies are planned to investigate higher doses of oxymetazoline for this indication. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A797.
Source: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: Stem Cell ReportsAuthor(s): Hui Jin, Yu-Ting Zhang, Yang Yang, Lan-Yu Wen, Jun-Hua Wang, Hao-Yu Xu, Bi-Qin Lai, Bo Feng, Ming-Tian Che, Xue-Cheng Qiu, Zhi-Ling Li, Lai-Jian Wang, Jing-Wen Ruan, Bin Jiang, Xiang Zeng, Qing-Wen Deng, Ge Li, Ying Ding, Yuan-Shan ZengSummaryThe hostile environment of an injured spinal cord makes it challenging to achieve higher viability in a grafted tissue-engineered neural network used to reconstruct the spinal cord circuit. Here, we investigate whether cell survival and synaptic transmission within an NT-3 and TRKC gene-overexpressin...
Source: Stem Cell Reports - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: Neuroscience LettersAuthor(s): Xifan Mei, Hongyu Wang, Hua Zhang, Chang Liu, Zhanpeng Guo, Yansong Wang, Yajiang Yuan, Ziming Zhao, Dingding Li, Peifu TangAbstractReceptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) is involved in neuronal inflammation, cell cycle and differentiation. However, the role of RAGE in autophagy in the process of spinal cord injury (SCI) is yet unknown. The present study investigated the effect of RAGE blockade on autophagy in SCI. A rat Allen SCI model was established and the animals were micro-injected with rabbit RAGE neutralizing antibo...
Source: Neuroscience Letters - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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