Neuralized1a regulates asymmetric division in mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cells

Publication date: 1 August 2018Source: Life Sciences, Volume 206Author(s): Liangsheng Kong, Jingyuan Li, Yongli Liu, Zhiwei Sun, Shixia Zhou, Junling Tang, Ting Ye, Jianyu Wang, H. Rosie XingAbstractAsymmetric division (ASD), the unique characteristic of normal stem cells, is regarded as a stemness marker when applied to the study of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, the role of ASD in the self-renewal of CSCs and its regulation remain largely unknown. Here, we first established a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma CSC cell line that could undergo asymmetric division (LLC-ASD cells) derived from the parental mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cancer cells (LLC-Parental cells). In vitro assessment of stemness by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis of stem cell markers, clonogenic assay (p 
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research

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Source: Liver Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
We report that the disruption of excitation-contraction coupling contributes to impaired force generation in the mouse model of Sod1 deficiency. Briefly, we found a significant reduction in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) activity as well as reduced expression of proteins involved in calcium release and force generation. Another potential factor involved in EC uncoupling in Sod1-/- mice is oxidative damage to proteins involved in the contractile response. In summary, this study provides strong support for the coupling between increased oxidative stress and disruption of cellular excitation contraction mac...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in cancer patients and occurs in up to 30% of patients during their disease course. Multiple myeloma, leukemia/lymphoma, renal cell carcinoma, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are commonly associated with the development of AKI.07/19/2018
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news
Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in cancer patients and occurs in up to 30% of patients during their disease course. Multiple myeloma, leukemia/lymphoma, renal cell carcinoma, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are commonly associated with the development of AKI. Drugs used to treat various malignancies are also a common and notable cause of AKI in this population. Nephrology consultation is important to ensure proper and rapid diagnosis, as well as appropriate therapy and follow-up. In particular, knowledge of the nephrotoxicity of the various anticancer regimens employed is cr...
Source: Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Oncology (Williston Park) Source Type: research
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Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
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Source: Cancer Letters - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 1 August 2018 Source:Life Sciences, Volume 206 Author(s): Liangsheng Kong, Jingyuan Li, Yongli Liu, Zhiwei Sun, Shixia Zhou, Junling Tang, Ting Ye, Jianyu Wang, H. Rosie Xing Asymmetric division (ASD), the unique characteristic of normal stem cells, is regarded as a stemness marker when applied to the study of cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, the role of ASD in the self-renewal of CSCs and its regulation remain largely unknown. Here, we first established a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma CSC cell line that could undergo asymmetric division (LLC-ASD cells) derived from the parental mouse Lewis lung carcinoma...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
This study showed that serially transplanted PDXs may not necessarily mirror the donor patients' diseases, and consequently, proper use of serially transplanted PDX models in translational cancer research requires careful molecular monitoring of the models. PMID: 29765518 [PubMed]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
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Source: European Journal of Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Eur J Pharmacol Source Type: research
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