Hope for menopausal women: Scientists find how to banish hot flashes

Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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ConclusionMultifactorial mechanisms lead to UUI and vascular risk factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of bladder overactivity in addition to higher BMI. Severe UUI appears to be a distinct presentation with more specific contributory mechanisms than milder UUI.
Source: BJU International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Publication date: February 2018 Source:Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 41 Author(s): Naice E.S. Monteiro, Lívia D. Queirós, Danielle B. Lopes, Adriana O. Pedro, Gabriela A. Macedo Menopause is a natural event that occurs in women around the age of 50 years, causing irregularities in the menstrual cycle until its complete end, due to the hormonal deficit, especially estrogen, that causes several unpleasant urogenital and vasomotor symptoms. Hormone replacement therapy has many benefits, but should be prescribed with caution in women with a history of stroke, thromboembolic events, certain types of cance...
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
More than 100 women die of breast cancer in the U.S. every day. It's the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American women. But in my opinion, many of those women really die of a tragic medical error. Let me explain… Millions of women in the U.S. have taken Big Pharma's hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Their doctors prescribe it to try to relieve the symptoms of menopause. Like hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings and weight gain. But what the drug companies try to pass off as hormones are actually synthetic concoctions. They are fake versions of the estrogen and progesterone that your body makes ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) Hormone replacement therapy has long been controversial as studies have associated it with health benefits and risks. While some studies suggest that it lowers the risk of osteoporosis and improves some aspects of heart health, others link it to higher risk of cancer and stroke. Now, a new imaging study suggests that women using hormone replacement therapy to relieve menopause symptoms face a lower risk of death and show lower levels of atherosclerosis compared to women who do not use hormone therapy.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
A 59-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of repeated episodes of bilateral hand weakness. She had a 10-year history of combined estrogen –progestin therapy for menopausal symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging on admission showed multiple hyperintense lesions in bilateral cerebral and cerebellar cortices on diffusion-weighted imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography showed thrombus formation on the aortic valve and moderate aortic i nsufficiency. Laboratory test demonstrated elevated CA125 (334.8 U/mL) and D-dimer (7.0 µg/mL) levels.
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Case Studies Source Type: research
Conclusion This study shows a strong link between migraine and cardiovascular disease, extending the link already found between migraine and stroke. However, many questions remain. We don't know if the results are relevant to men who have migraines, as all the people in the study were women. We also don't know if the results apply to non-white populations, as most of the women in the study were white. Previous studies on stroke have shown that the group at highest risk is who get an "aura" before a migraine – sensation(s) that tells them the migraine is on its way. But this study did not ask people about ...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news
ConclusionThis double-blind RCT found that women taking HRT less than six years after the menopause had slower artery wall thickening than those taking a placebo. This represented the main measure of atherosclerosis progression tested; other measures showed no difference, so the results were not as conclusive as they could have been. Women taking HRT 10 or more years after menopause also showed no difference in atherosclerosis progression compared with a placebo, further complicating the picture.An important limitation of this study is the lack of a patient relevant endpoint, such as cardiovascular events or mortality. Pre...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news
National Wear Red Day® is a special day dedicated to bringing attention to this staggering fact that each year, 1 in 3 women die of heart disease and stroke. Today we wear red to encourage women to raise their voices, know their cardiovascular risk and take action to live longer, healthier lives. For more information visit: http://www.goredforwomen.org/wearredday/. In honor of National Wear Red Day® we are re-running the post below. Heart Disease – It Looks Different From a Woman’s Perspective By Terri L. McCulloch Lara D. knew that heart disease ran in her family. Her father had his first heart ...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Advocacy Women's Health Source Type: blogs
BACKGROUND: TIAs and migraines have both been found to increase the risk of ischemic strokes. The risk for ischemic strokes may be further increased in patients with both of these risk factors. OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of ischemic strokes in women with and without a history of migraine following a TIA. METHODS: The Observational Study (OS) of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) was the observational component of the WHI Study. We analyzed the 93,676 women aged 50-79 years, who participated in the OS over a period of 12±1 years. We determined the risk of incident ischemic stroke following TIAs in women wi...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology: Education and TIA Source Type: research
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