epidemix—An interactive multi-model application for teaching and visualizing infectious disease transmission

Publication date: June 2018Source: Epidemics, Volume 23Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. PfeifferAbstractMathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions. However, their mathematical formulation means that they may appear as a “black box” to those without the appropriate mathematical background. This may lead to a negative perception of their utility for guiding policy, and generate expectations, which are not in line with what these models can deliver. It is therefore important for policymakers, as well as public health and animal health professionals and researchers who collaborate with modelers and use results generated by these models for policy development or research purpose, to understand the key concepts and assumptions underlying these models.The software application epidemix (http://shinyapps.rvc.ac.uk) presented here aims to make mathematical models of disease transmission accessible to a wider audience of users. By developing a visual interface for a suite of eight models, users can develop a...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: The high frequency of multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing isolates should alert the regional health authorities to take measures to reduce the risk of outbreaks caused by these types of bacteria in the community. PMID: 31529852 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Biomedica Source Type: research
[Miocarditis fulminante en adultos por el virus de la influenza B: reporte de dos casos y revisión de la literatura]. Biomedica. 2019 Aug 01;39(Supl. 2):11-19 Authors: Silva E, Montenegro JS, Estupiñán MC, Arias G, Osorio JP, Poveda CM, Buitrago R Abstract La miocarditis es una enfermedad inflamatoria del miocardio. Las infecciones virales son la causa más común, aunque también puede deberse a reacciones de hipersensibilidad y de etiología autoinmunitaria, entre otras. El espectro clínico de la enfermedad es variado y comprende desde un curso asin...
Source: Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Biomedica Source Type: research
[Inmunorreacción de la infección por el virus de Zika en retina de ratones]. Biomedica. 2019 Aug 01;39(Supl. 2):8-10 Authors: Rivera J, Rengifo AC, Santamaría G, Corchuelo S, Álvarez-Díaz D, Parra EA, Naizaque J, Monroy-Gómez J, Torres-Fernández O PMID: 31529828 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomedica : Revista del Instituto Nacional de Salud - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Biomedica Source Type: research
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017 Source:Epidemics Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. Pfeiffer Mathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017 Source:Epidemics Author(s): Ulrich Muellner, Guillaume Fournié, Petra Muellner, Christina Ahlstrom, Dirk U. Pfeiffer Mathematical models of disease transmission are used to improve our understanding of patterns of infection and to identify factors influencing them. During recent public and animal health crises, such as pandemic influenza, Ebola, Zika, foot-and-mouth disease, models have made important contributions in addressing policy questions, especially through the assessment of the trajectory and scale of outbreaks, and the evaluation of control interventions...
Source: Epidemics - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
World Health Organization. 02/2017 This introductory level online course aims to equip frontline responders with the latest know-how to manage outbreaks of known and emerging epidemic-prone diseases in the 21st century. It focuses on 13 infectious hazards, offering the most relevant scientific, technical, and operational knowledge through video presentations and self-tests. Diseases discussed include Ebola, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), pandemic influenza, yellow fever, and Zika. (Video or Multimedia) Site requires free registration.
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: news
Across China, the virus that could spark the next pandemic is already circulating. It’s a bird flu called H7N9, and true to its name, it mostly infects poultry. Lately, however, it’s started jumping from chickens to humans more readily–bad news, because the virus is a killer. During a recent spike, 88% of people infected got pneumonia, three-quarters ended up in intensive care with severe respiratory problems, and 41% died. What H7N9 can’t do–yet–is spread easily from person to person, but experts know that could change. The longer the virus spends in humans, the better the chance that i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC Disease ebola Gates Foundation MERS outbreak pandemic Zika Source Type: news
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.  function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTi...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The Zika virus attracted many headlines this winter, but a recent admission by the chief medical officer at a leading vaccine manufacturer -- that the world is ill-prepared to deal with pandemic outbreaks -- underscores a fundamental problem. To ensure safety and efficacy, the federal government's regulatory approval process for new vaccines may extend development timelines for years. So when The New York Times reports that "eighteen organizations are working on developing a vaccine for the Zika virus," it is likely that those companies will labor for a very long time. Vaccinations rightly require stri...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
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