Scientists discover a way to banish hot flashes without raising a woman's stroke risk

Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Since the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) has been stopped 2002 due to increased risk of venous thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, stroke and breast cancer, safety issues have got great concern using hormone replacement therapy (HRT). However, using lower dosages, other hormonal components and/or transdermal instead of oral application can reduce those risks although not demonstrated in a placebo-controlled study comparable to WHI. However, this has been shown in large case/control- and cohort-studies reflecting more practical conditions in contrast to WHI.
Source: Maturitas - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: INV65 Source Type: research
Conclusions World population is aging and the increase in life expectancy is often unhealthy. In particular, musculoskeletal aging, which leads to sarcopenia and osteoporosis, has several causes such as changes in body composition, inflammation, and hormonal imbalance. Sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and more frequently, sarcopenic obesity are commonly associated with aging and frequently closely linked each other, often leading to the development of a frailty syndrome. Frailty syndrome favors an increased risk of loss function in daily activities, for cardiovascular diseases, cancers, falls, and mortality. As the number of eld...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study demonstrated that the incidence of ischemic heart disease and death were three times higher among men with low birth weight compared to men with high birth weight (5). Epidemiological investigations of adults born at the time of the Dutch famine between 1944 and 1945 revealed an association between maternal starvation and a low infant birth weight with a high incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease in these adults (23). Furthermore, Painter et al. reported the incidence of early onset coronary heart disease among persons conceived during the Dutch famine (24). In that regard, Barker's findin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
(Natural News) Hormone replacement therapy (HRT), or simply hormone therapy (HT), is the only medical treatment that successfully minimizes the side effects of menopause, such as hot flashes and night sweats. It is also known to address other female problems such as vaginal dryness and uterine discomfort, as well as inhibit the production of estrogen...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
ConclusionYounger initiation of HRT may be effective in reducing death and cardiac events. However, younger HRT initiators remained at an increased risk of stroke, TIA and systemic embolism and this risk increased as average age increased. Younger menopausal women using HRT to treat vasomotor symptoms do not appear to be at an increased risk of dying or experiencing CHD events.
Source: IJC Heart and Vasculature - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Abstract Neurological diseases such as ischemic stroke can be debilitating and have limited treatments available. The progestin Nestorone® (segesterone acetate) has been evaluated for use in birth control and hormone replacement therapy due to its potency and high affinity for the progesterone receptor. Interestingly, Nestorone also exerts neuroprotection in animals afflicted with various central nervous system diseases, including stroke, which implicates its potential for treating these maladies in clinical settings. In fact, a recent Brain Research paper by Tanaka and colleagues demonstrates Nestorone's abil...
Source: Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Res Source Type: research
Our panel this morning discussed the issues surrounding how the WHI results were interpreted and communicated to women and their health care providers. We recognize that hormones are not appropriate for all women, and look forward to hosting a future panel that highlights alternatives. The speakers have a variety of backgrounds and experiences (and genders), and we aim to promote diversity of voices. This was not normal breakfast conversation. Today was a jolting – and disruptive – talk about what happens to women’s bodies when they age. (Who knew that if you’re menopausal and you don’t take y...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
(MedPage Today) -- Drop in risk occurred regardless of menopausal status or hormone replacement therapy
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - Category: Cardiology Source Type: news
In conclusion, HSC ageing is characterised by reduced self-renewal, myeloid and platelet HSC skewing, and expanded clonal haematopoiesis that is considered a preleukaemic state. The underlying molecular mechanisms seem to be related to increased oxidative stress due to ROS accumulation and DNA damage, which are influenced by both cell- and cell non-autonomous mechanisms such as prolonged exposure to infections, inflammageing, immunosenescence, and age-related changes in the HSC niche. Thus, HSC ageing seems to be multifactorial and we are only beginning to connect all the dots. The Price of Progress or the Waste...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Brain | Health | Hormone Replacement Therapy | Hormones | Neurology | Stroke | University of Washington