Scientists discover a way to banish hot flashes without raising a woman's stroke risk

Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: July 2018Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, Volume 23Author(s): Simon B.N. Thompson, Alister Coleman, Nicola WilliamsAbstractYawning is a significant behavioural response and, together with cortisol, is potentially a new diagnostic marker of neurological diseases. Evidence of an association between yawning and cortisol was found which supports the Thompson Cortisol Hypothesis and thermoregulation hypotheses, indication that brain cooling occurs when yawning. 117 volunteers aged 18–69 years were randomly allocated to experimentally controlled conditions to provoke yawning. Thirty-three...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: ALA could provide a potential treatment for atherosclerosis in postmenopausal patients.Cell Physiol Biochem 2018;47:2261 –2277
Source: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 May 2018 Source:Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders Author(s): Simon B N Thompson, Alister Coleman, Nicola Williams Yawning is a significant behavioural response and, together with cortisol, is potentially a new diagnostic marker of neurological diseases. Evidence of an association between yawning and cortisol was found which supports the Thompson Cortisol Hypothesis and thermoregulation hypotheses, indication that brain cooling occurs when yawning. 117 volunteers aged 18-69 years were randomly allocated to experimentally controlled conditions to provoke yawning. Thirty-three had ...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionMultifactorial mechanisms lead to UUI and vascular risk factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of bladder overactivity in addition to higher BMI. Severe UUI appears to be a distinct presentation with more specific contributory mechanisms than milder UUI.
Source: BJU International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Publication date: February 2018 Source:Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 41 Author(s): Naice E.S. Monteiro, Lívia D. Queirós, Danielle B. Lopes, Adriana O. Pedro, Gabriela A. Macedo Menopause is a natural event that occurs in women around the age of 50 years, causing irregularities in the menstrual cycle until its complete end, due to the hormonal deficit, especially estrogen, that causes several unpleasant urogenital and vasomotor symptoms. Hormone replacement therapy has many benefits, but should be prescribed with caution in women with a history of stroke, thromboembolic events, certain types of cance...
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
A 53-year-old male-to-female transgender patient on cross-sex hormone replacement therapy (CSHT), estradiol 8 mg daily, presented to the emergency department (ED) with acute-onset headache and left visual field disturbances after a recent mechanical fall with head trauma. The medical history was notable for hyperlipidemia. There was no personal or family history of clotting disorders and no history of tobacco use.
Source: Neurology Clinical Practice - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: All Cerebrovascular disease/Stroke, Cerebral venous thrombosis Case Source Type: research
Soy phytoestrogens are potential alternatives to postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Adverse effects of HRT such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and pulmonary embolism are mediated by calcium-induced signaling
Source: Clinical Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
Soy phytoestrogens are potential alternatives to postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Adverse effects of HRT such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and pulmonary embolism are mediated by calcium-induced signaling.
Source: Clinical Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Randomized Control Trials Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
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