Scientists discover a way to banish hot flashes without raising a woman's stroke risk

Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Abstract Neurological diseases such as ischemic stroke can be debilitating and have limited treatments available. The progestin Nestorone® (segesterone acetate) has been evaluated for use in birth control and hormone replacement therapy due to its potency and high affinity for the progesterone receptor. Interestingly, Nestorone also exerts neuroprotection in animals afflicted with various central nervous system diseases, including stroke, which implicates its potential for treating these maladies in clinical settings. In fact, a recent Brain Research paper by Tanaka and colleagues demonstrates Nestorone's abil...
Source: Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Res Source Type: research
Our panel this morning discussed the issues surrounding how the WHI results were interpreted and communicated to women and their health care providers. We recognize that hormones are not appropriate for all women, and look forward to hosting a future panel that highlights alternatives. The speakers have a variety of backgrounds and experiences (and genders), and we aim to promote diversity of voices. This was not normal breakfast conversation. Today was a jolting – and disruptive – talk about what happens to women’s bodies when they age. (Who knew that if you’re menopausal and you don’t take y...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
(MedPage Today) -- Drop in risk occurred regardless of menopausal status or hormone replacement therapy
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - Category: Cardiology Source Type: news
In conclusion, HSC ageing is characterised by reduced self-renewal, myeloid and platelet HSC skewing, and expanded clonal haematopoiesis that is considered a preleukaemic state. The underlying molecular mechanisms seem to be related to increased oxidative stress due to ROS accumulation and DNA damage, which are influenced by both cell- and cell non-autonomous mechanisms such as prolonged exposure to infections, inflammageing, immunosenescence, and age-related changes in the HSC niche. Thus, HSC ageing seems to be multifactorial and we are only beginning to connect all the dots. The Price of Progress or the Waste...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Scientists at the University of Washington have shown we could target a neuron rather than estrogen levels with drugs. Hormone replacement therapy reduces hot flashes but increases stroke risk.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Publication date: July 2018Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders, Volume 23Author(s): Simon B.N. Thompson, Alister Coleman, Nicola WilliamsAbstractYawning is a significant behavioural response and, together with cortisol, is potentially a new diagnostic marker of neurological diseases. Evidence of an association between yawning and cortisol was found which supports the Thompson Cortisol Hypothesis and thermoregulation hypotheses, indication that brain cooling occurs when yawning. 117 volunteers aged 18–69 years were randomly allocated to experimentally controlled conditions to provoke yawning. Thirty-three...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: ALA could provide a potential treatment for atherosclerosis in postmenopausal patients.Cell Physiol Biochem 2018;47:2261 –2277
Source: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 May 2018 Source:Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders Author(s): Simon B N Thompson, Alister Coleman, Nicola Williams Yawning is a significant behavioural response and, together with cortisol, is potentially a new diagnostic marker of neurological diseases. Evidence of an association between yawning and cortisol was found which supports the Thompson Cortisol Hypothesis and thermoregulation hypotheses, indication that brain cooling occurs when yawning. 117 volunteers aged 18-69 years were randomly allocated to experimentally controlled conditions to provoke yawning. Thirty-three had ...
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionMultifactorial mechanisms lead to UUI and vascular risk factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of bladder overactivity in addition to higher BMI. Severe UUI appears to be a distinct presentation with more specific contributory mechanisms than milder UUI.
Source: BJU International - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Publication date: February 2018 Source:Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 41 Author(s): Naice E.S. Monteiro, Lívia D. Queirós, Danielle B. Lopes, Adriana O. Pedro, Gabriela A. Macedo Menopause is a natural event that occurs in women around the age of 50 years, causing irregularities in the menstrual cycle until its complete end, due to the hormonal deficit, especially estrogen, that causes several unpleasant urogenital and vasomotor symptoms. Hormone replacement therapy has many benefits, but should be prescribed with caution in women with a history of stroke, thromboembolic events, certain types of cance...
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
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