The user-friendliness of drama: Implications for drama therapy and psychodrama admission and training

This article addresses the claim that drama is a user-friendly art form that can be mastered relatively intuitively with less reliance on knowledge and practice-driven skills than other artistic modalities. Attention is given to the concept that this inherent quality warrants revisiting the drama-based prerequisites for drama therapy and psychodrama training. To this end, I first review the arts-based prerequisites for music therapy, art therapy, dance movement therapy, as well as drama therapy and psychodrama training in Israel, the US and the UK. I then highlight the three main developmental, psychosocial, and artistic reasons that underpin the argument regarding the perceived user-friendliness of drama, a quality that is both a blessing and a problem for the student and teacher of drama therapy and psychodrama. The paradox associated with the user-friendliness of drama is that although the lay and intuitive sense of familiarity with drama makes it appealing to many students who lack solid pre-training experience with drama, some may face considerable challenges in understanding and trusting the dramatic processes as therapists in training. I suggest how drama therapy and psychodrama training programs can fulfill the requirements for in-depth knowledge of drama, theater, and/or performance that distinguishes drama-based therapies from other creative arts therapies. Suggestions for specific drama-based requirements before and during training are put forward.
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

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Various types of therapies have proven to be useful in alcohol and drug rehab programs, but music therapy is a tool that many individuals seeking treatment may not understand fully. Studies have shown that music therapy provides significant healing, emotionally, physically, and mentally, and it may end up being an important aspect of your own substance abuse treatment. What Is Music Therapy? Music therapy is very different from music in the form of entertainment. It is a clinical and evidence-based therapeutic practice that utilizes music to accomplish goals within an individual’s therapy program.1 Each client&rsquo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Creativity Habits LifeHelper Psychology Psychotherapy Recovery Substance Abuse Treatment Drug rehabilitation Music Therapy Source Type: blogs
The objective of this study was to examine specific cardiovascular and affective effects of live music matched with the listener’s heart beat, with the tempo gradually decreased to assess the relaxation effect.Thirty apparently healthy students were randomized to either the experimental (EG) or the control group (CG). After a brief mental stress task, both groups listened to a live music therapy relaxation technique. While a biofeedback device was utilized to enable real-time synchronization of relaxing music to the listener’s pulse in the EG, the tempo in the CG was fixed to 70 beats per minute. Self-ratings o...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2018Source: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Volume 60Author(s): Steven Lyons, Vicky Karkou, Brenda Roe, Bonnie Meekums, Michael RichardsAbstractIn England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for supporting people with dementia recommend the therapeutic use of dancing and/or music as a treatment for non-cognitive symptoms, but make no direct reference to dance movement therapy or music therapy. Also, previous Cochrane Reviews in these areas have been criticized for being limited to randomized controlled trials focusing on outcomes. In order to maximize findings and...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2018Source: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Volume 60Author(s): Sue Baines, Jane EdwardsAbstractAnalytical emancipatory social justice and anti-oppressive practice concepts have begun to be integrated into music therapy to inform and expand the theoretical basis of practice (Sajnani et al., 2017). Anti-oppressive practices (AOP) in music therapy have been developed to expose and undo both obvious and unknown oppression to increase social justice within music therapy systems, practice, and research (Baines, 2013). Music therapy as an Anti-Oppressive Practice (Baines, 2013) was examined in two sites, 1...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Volume 59Author(s): Michael J. Silverman, Jennifer BibbAbstractA small number of papers indicate that music therapists are interested in how their work is perceived by other healthcare professionals. The research reported in this paper examined assumptions and expectations of music therapy by mental health professionals in order to understand better how music therapists might use effective strategies to empower greater knowledge of their practice and services. We conducted semi-structured interviews with seven clinical staff members of an acute mental health fac...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
This article focuses on how young people conceptualise this approach to music therapy practice. In the last decade, several approaches have emerged in the creative arts therapies that aim to critically explore power, and challenge dominant socio-political discourses. While there has been a dedicated interest in critical, feminist approaches to practice in the music therapy discipline, empirical research into music therapy as a space for exploring gendered narratives with young people is still evolving. Furthermore, we have little sense of how anti-oppressive approaches are experienced by the people of all ages with whom we...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Volume 59Author(s): Lori F. Gooding, Bethany TrainorAbstractParents of infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often face a variety of emotional and practical challenges that can lead to post-traumatic stress symptoms, acute stress disorder, or posttraumatic stress disorder. Music therapy has consistently shown benefits for infants, parents, and caregivers, but limited information exists on how music therapists specifically address parents’ needs. The purpose of this study was to explore American music therapists’ experiences ...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 July 2017Source: The Arts in PsychotherapyAuthor(s): Miranda S. Grimmer, Melody Schwantes
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to examine specific cardiovascular and affective effects of live music matched with the listener’s heart beat, with the tempo gradually decreased to assess the relaxation effect.Thirty apparently healthy students were randomized to either the experimental (EG) or the control group (CG). After a brief mental stress task, both groups listened to a live music therapy relaxation technique. While a biofeedback device was utilized to enable real-time synchronization of relaxing music to the listener’s pulse in the EG, the tempo in the CG was fixed to 70 beats per minute. Self-ratings o...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2018Source: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Volume 60Author(s): Sue Baines, Jane EdwardsAbstractAnalytical emancipatory social justice and anti-oppressive practice concepts have begun to be integrated into music therapy to inform and expand the theoretical basis of practice (Sajnani et al., 2017). Anti-oppressive practices (AOP) in music therapy have been developed to expose and undo both obvious and unknown oppression to increase social justice within music therapy systems, practice, and research (Baines, 2013). Music therapy as an Anti-Oppressive Practice (Baines, 2013) was examined in two sites, 1...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
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