What research evidence is there that dance movement therapy improves the health and wellbeing of older adults with dementia? A systematic review and descriptive narrative summary

Publication date: September 2018Source: The Arts in Psychotherapy, Volume 60Author(s): Steven Lyons, Vicky Karkou, Brenda Roe, Bonnie Meekums, Michael RichardsAbstractIn England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for supporting people with dementia recommend the therapeutic use of dancing and/or music as a treatment for non-cognitive symptoms, but make no direct reference to dance movement therapy or music therapy. Also, previous Cochrane Reviews in these areas have been criticized for being limited to randomized controlled trials focusing on outcomes. In order to maximize findings and explore the clinical process, this systematic review aimed to examine a broad range of research evidence (including quantitative, qualitative and arts based studies) for the benefits to health and wellbeing for adults aged 65 and older with dementia. Searches were conducted on multiple databases using predefined keywords. Two reviewers screened the texts retrieved using inclusion and exclusion criteria. The selection and process was determined by the PRISMA statement and the quality of included studies was appraised using a grading system. Results from the dance movement therapy literature are presented here in the form of a descriptive narrative summary. Findings show the existing evidence base consists of five mainly qualitative observational studies of varying methodological quality. Theoretically the included studies draw upon a person-centred approach,...
Source: Arts in Psychotherapy - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

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We examined differences in dementia risk between low-educated non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, and African Americans, and the impact of lifetime risk factors using data from the nationally representative Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (N = 819). RESULTS: As indicated by Cox regression modeling, dementia risk of low-educated individuals was not significantly different between ethnic groups but was related to having an APOE e4 allele (hazard ratio [HR] 1.89), depression (HR 1.67), stroke (HR 1.60), and smoking (HR 1.32). Further, even in people with low education, every additional year of education de...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news
Antipsychotic medications are the cornerstone of schizophrenia treatment, but are used in a range of other psychiatric conditions, including dementia. Prescribing such drugs to older people is common, particularly in care home residents [1], and potentially risky [2]. Much antipsychotic use in the elderly is off-label. There is a paucity of evidence about their efficacy, mostly extrapolated from data in younger adults. Side effects of antipsychotics are diverse and are known to affect adherence.
Source: Maturitas - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
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Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Regular Research Articles Source Type: research
Abstract Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that major depressive disorder increases the risk of dementia in older individuals with mild cognitive impairment. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the intrinsic coupling patterns between the amplitude and synchronisation of low-frequency brain fluctuations using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and the functional connectivity density (FCD) in 16 patients who had mild cognitive impairment with depressive symptoms (D-MCI) (mean age: 69.6 ± 6.2 years) and 18 patients with nondepressed mild cog...
Source: Neural Plasticity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neural Plast Source Type: research
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Source: Behavioural Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Neurol Source Type: research
Antivirals could provide a treatment... → Enjoying these psych studies? Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month (includes ad-free experience and more articles). → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: NEW: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dementia subscribers-only Source Type: blogs
Antivirals could provide a treatment... → Enjoying these psych studies? Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month (includes ad-free experience and more articles). → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: NEW: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dementia Source Type: blogs
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