Gender and Racial Disparities in Initial Hemodialysis Access and Outcomes in Incident End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

Conclusion: Females had lower odds of using AV access than do males for hemodialysis initiation. As compared to whites, blacks and Asians were more likely, and Hispanics were less likely to use AV access for first outpatient hemodialysis. Further investigation of biological and process of care factors may help in developing ways to reduce these disparities.Am J Nephrol 2018;48:4 –14
Source: American Journal of Nephrology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: Compared with patients with nonoptimal starts, patients with optimal ESRD starts have lower morbidity and mortality and less use of inpatient and outpatient care. Late-stage chronic kidney disease and ESRD care in an integrated system may be associated with greater benefits than those previously reported in the literature. PMID: 30325191 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The American Journal of Managed Care - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Am J Manag Care Source Type: research
Authors: Gómez de la Torre-Del Carpio A, Bocanegra-Jesús A, Guinetti-Ortiz K, Mayta-Tristán P, Valdivia-Vega R Abstract OBJECTIVES: To estimate early mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease who started emergency haemodialysis between 2012 and 2014 in a national referral hospital in Lima, Peru, and to identify risk factors. DESIGN, CHARACTERISTICS, PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted by reviewing the medical records of all patients admitted to the hospital's Haemodialysis Unit from 2012 to 2014. Early mortality, defined as death within the firs...
Source: Nefrologia : publicacion oficial de la Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Nefrologia Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Females had lower odds of using AV access than do males for hemodialysis initiation. As compared to whites, blacks and Asians were more likely, and Hispanics were less likely to use AV access for first outpatient hemodialysis. Further investigation of biological and process of care factors may help in developing ways to reduce these disparities. PMID: 29990994 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: American Journal of Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Am J Nephrol Source Type: research
Abstract Arteriovenous fistula is the preferred option for vascular access in hemodialysis patients. The aim of this study was to assess different follow‐up methods for hemodialysis patients in our hemodialysis center in China. A cohort of 124 patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease was recruited and double‐blind randomly assigned into two groups. Patients in Group A received phone calls to schedule their next consultation a week in advance. Patients in Group B scheduled their next appointment at the end of each visit. A total of 116 patients were included in the study and eight dropped out. Twenty‐seven patient...
Source: Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Authors: Alfano G, Fontana F, Iannaccone M, Noussan P, Cappelli G Abstract Native arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the favorite access for hemodialysis (HD). The National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) recommends its creation in most patients with renal failure. Unfortunately, intensive efforts to promote native AVF in patients with marginal vessels have increased the rate of primary fistula failure. A non-functioning fistula prompts the use of central venous catheter (CVC) that, unlike AVF, has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality among patients re...
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
Conclusions The cost-effectiveness of vascular access referral is largely driven by the annual costs of HD, erythropoietin costs, and access-specific utilities. Further research is needed in the field of dialysis-related quality of life to inform decision making regarding vascular access referral.
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Chronic renal replacement therapy with hemodialysis and strict uremic, electrolyte, and volume control may be more beneficial for patients with advanced heart failure with preserved or reduced LVEF than ultrafiltration alone. We have observed better survival of terminal cardiorenal patients treated with hemodialysis than in the general NYHA IV population, with lower hospital readmission rate and less hospitalized days for heart failure.
. PMID: 28655387 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Clin Nephrol Source Type: research
Conclusions The cost-effectiveness of vascular access referral is largely driven by the annual costs of HD, erythropoietin costs, and access-specific utilities. Further research is needed in the field of dialysis-related quality of life to inform decision making regarding vascular access referral.
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Assessment of catheter dialysis tip location with radiological image seems to be a prudent measure after each procedure even if the tunneled dialysis catheter has been introduced with fluoroscopy image. PMID: 28355402 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Jornal Brasileiro de Nefrologia - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: J Bras Nefrol Source Type: research
The initiation of dialysis is a challenging time of transition for patients, families, and their supporters. Patients with exposure to a comprehensive chronic kidney disease clinic may have had education and subsequent decision making regarding dialysis modality and access; however, many patients with or without prior education will require an urgent start to dialysis, requiring quick decisions regarding dialysis modality and access. In many countries, hemodialysis (HD) using a central venous catheter (CVC) is the most common initial renal replacement modality and dialysis access.
Source: Seminars in Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
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