the healing edge: Dying Organs Restored to Life in Novel Experiments

An unusual transplant may revive tissues thought to be hopelessly damaged, including the heart and brain.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Transplants Babies and Infants Heart Mitochondria Surgery and Surgeons Tissue (Human) Deaths (Fatalities) Boston Children's Hospital Source Type: news

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Abstract Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, affecting 1 in 100 babies. Among CHDs, single ventricle (SV) physiologies, such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome and tricuspid atresia, are particularly severe conditions that require multiple palliative surgeries, including the Fontan procedure. Although the management strategies for SV patients have markedly improved, the prevalence of ventricular dysfunction continues to increase over time, especially after the Fontan procedure. At present, the final treatment for SV patients who develop heart failure is heart transplantation; however, t...
Source: The Keio Journal of Medicine - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Keio J Med Source Type: research
Life expectancy is continuously growing but how far could it be stretched? Could you imagine that the average person lived beyond 130 years of age? How would longevity transform societies and our ways of life? Based on the book, My Health: Upgraded. The quest for immortality Humanity has been yearning for the secret of immortality since the first temple for the ever-living Gods was built, which might have been 12,000 years ago in Gobekli Tepe, according to the current state of archeology. The ancient legends and myths are full of tales about how men on Earth wanted to join the community of immortals. However, sometim...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine aging digital innovation Healthcare immortality longevity Personalized medicine society technology Source Type: blogs
Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect globally, affecting almost nine in every 1,000 babies. Tissue engineering, which involves combining regenerative cells, proteins, or drugs with biomaterials, is a promising strategy to treat co...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiac Surgery Exclusive Materials Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, a debate exists on whether aging is a disease in itself. Some authors suggest that physiological aging (or senescence) is not really distinguishable from pathology, while others argue that aging is different from age-related diseases and other pathologies. It is interesting to stress that the answer to this question has important theoretical and practical consequences, taking into account that various strategies capable of setting back the aging clock are emerging. The most relevant consequence is that, if we agree that aging is equal to disease, all human beings have to be considered as patients to be treat...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The first pediatric heart transplant was undertaken Dec 6, 1967, just 3 days after the first adult transplant, 50 years ago. The baby died a few hours after transplant. The medical literature has not recorded the first successful transplant. The ISHLT registry began in 1982 however we discovered a group of patients, transplanted prior to 1982, had been entered retrospectively into the registry. The study aim was to report on these patients whose outcomes were unknown.
Source: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
I have blogged in the past about how the mission and nature of hospitals in the U.S. is changing rapidly (see, for example:The Design of Bedless Hospitals Continue to Evolve Based on Cost and Technology; Some Additional Ideas About the Bedless Hospitals of the Future; The Case of the"Disappearing Hospital Beds"; Implications for Pathologists). This same idea was covered in a somewhat controversial recent article by Ezekiel Emanuel with the provocative headline that asked whether hospitals were becoming obsolete (see:Are Hospitals Becoming Obsolete?). Below is an excerpt from it:What year saw the ma...
Source: Lab Soft News - Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Cost of Healthcare Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Innovations Hospital Financial Reference Laboratories Source Type: blogs
Abbott churned out an impressive number of new products last year, and our 2017 Medtech Company of the Year doesn't appear to be slowing down any. This week FDA approved Abbott's new pediatric mechanical heart valve, which is the first device of its kind that is small enough to be used in newborns and infants. Learn about the latest trends in medical device R&D and product development at BIOMEDevice Boston, April 18-19, 2018. Use promo code "MDDI" for 20% off conference registration and free expo access. Previously, surgeons could only use a range of larger-sized valves to replace a pediatric heart valve, Abbott ...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiovascular Source Type: news
ConclusionsThis case suggested that at least the leadership of one prestigious university medical center is very uncomfortable at best, with its residents publicly expressing certain political opinions, even clearly outside the confines of the hospital.  Whether the leaders felt licensed by the President of the United States, who had banned the person at the center of this case from following him on Twitter, is a reasonable question.It may not be unreasonable to expect physicians and physician-trainees, as medical professionals, to avoid getting into political arguments with patients.  However, it is unreasonable...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Management Tags: academic freedom anechoic effect free speech post-graduate medical education Vanderbilt University Source Type: blogs
Today is Oliver Cameron’s first birthday and he and his parents have a lot to celebrate. After a year of uncertainty, they will be enjoying a quiet dinner with family at their home in Wantage, a town in Oxfordshire, England. “Having him home and healthy is the best present ever,” says his mom, Lydia. She and her husband, Tim, are looking forward to some quiet time alone with Oliver and their family after spending much of the last year fighting for his life. Oliver was born with a large, non-cancerous tumor, called a cardiac fibroma, inside his heart. It was so rare that only a handful of doctors in the U....
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories cardiac fibroma Cardiac Tumor Program Dr. Pedro del Nido Dr. Tal Geva Source Type: news
In conclusion, death is a natural part of human existence, but human progress is essentially a story of overcoming undesirable natural limits. In the near future, technological progress might make it possible to stop natural biological death. Should humankind embrace such technology? Yes: Even though such technology would not be without risks, the risks are almost certainly manageable. The benefits of ending natural death, on the other hand, are immense. Death is an obstacle that is slowing down human progress. If we remove that obstacle, humankind could increase the speed of both its moral and its epistemic progress. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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