Alpha-Lipoic Acid Protects Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Against H 2 O 2 -Induced Injury and Inhibits Atherosclerosis in Ovariectomized Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Knock-Out Mice

Conclusions: ALA could provide a potential treatment for atherosclerosis in postmenopausal patients.Cell Physiol Biochem 2018;47:2261 –2277
Source: Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry - Category: Cytology Source Type: research

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Publication date: February 2018 Source:Journal of Functional Foods, Volume 41 Author(s): Naice E.S. Monteiro, Lívia D. Queirós, Danielle B. Lopes, Adriana O. Pedro, Gabriela A. Macedo Menopause is a natural event that occurs in women around the age of 50 years, causing irregularities in the menstrual cycle until its complete end, due to the hormonal deficit, especially estrogen, that causes several unpleasant urogenital and vasomotor symptoms. Hormone replacement therapy has many benefits, but should be prescribed with caution in women with a history of stroke, thromboembolic events, certain types of cance...
Source: Journal of Functional Foods - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
More than 100 women die of breast cancer in the U.S. every day. It's the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American women. But in my opinion, many of those women really die of a tragic medical error. Let me explain… Millions of women in the U.S. have taken Big Pharma's hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Their doctors prescribe it to try to relieve the symptoms of menopause. Like hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings and weight gain. But what the drug companies try to pass off as hormones are actually synthetic concoctions. They are fake versions of the estrogen and progesterone that your body makes ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
The risk of heart attack, stroke or breast cancer due to hormone replacement therapy has been overstated, and that has scared away some women who could benefit from it, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada said at its annual conference in Ottawa this week.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) Hormone replacement therapy has long been controversial as studies have associated it with health benefits and risks. While some studies suggest that it lowers the risk of osteoporosis and improves some aspects of heart health, others link it to higher risk of cancer and stroke. Now, a new imaging study suggests that women using hormone replacement therapy to relieve menopause symptoms face a lower risk of death and show lower levels of atherosclerosis compared to women who do not use hormone therapy.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
ConclusionThe results of this study show that SOE has therapeutic effects on osteoporosis, while it has no adverse effects on lipid profile, uric acid, liver and kidney functions when compared to HRT. SOE offers a promising alternative in the design of new strategies in nutritional management of age-related bone complications.
Source: The Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
AbstractGrowth hormone replacement therapy has benefits for patients with hypopituitarism. The safety profile in regard to tumor recurrence or progression, development of secondary malignancies, or cerebrovascular stroke is still an area of debate. A comprehensive search of multiple databases —MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus was conducted through August 2015. Eligible studies that evaluated long-term adverse events in adult patients with hypopituitarism treated with growth hormone replacement therapy a nd reported development of pitu...
Source: Endocrine - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionThis double-blind RCT found that women taking HRT less than six years after the menopause had slower artery wall thickening than those taking a placebo. This represented the main measure of atherosclerosis progression tested; other measures showed no difference, so the results were not as conclusive as they could have been. Women taking HRT 10 or more years after menopause also showed no difference in atherosclerosis progression compared with a placebo, further complicating the picture.An important limitation of this study is the lack of a patient relevant endpoint, such as cardiovascular events or mortality. Pre...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog, Medical Discovery News Have you ever heard doctors referred to as "pill pushers"? While medical professionals provide necessary and admirable services, it does make you wonder how many pills we take in a day, a month, a year or even a lifetime. In the British Museum in London, along with the Rosetta Stone and an Easter Island head, there is an exhibit with an expansive glass table, more than a yard wide and at least 20 yards long. On it rests a tapestry-like depiction of the number of pills two individuals would take over their lifetimes in various colors and sizes. On on...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
ConclusionThis large prospective study aimed to assess whether happiness or related measures of wellbeing are associated with risk of death, after allowing for the influence of the poor health and lifestyles of people who are unhappy.The study found poor health was linked with unhappiness in middle-aged women. However, after allowing for this association and adjusting for the influence of other factors that may be associated, such as smoking and poor socioeconomic status, happiness and related measures of wellbeing do not appear to have any direct effect on death. This suggests that, as has sometimes previously been s...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Mental health Source Type: news
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