Sleep disorder linked with changes to brain structure typical of dementia

(European Lung Foundation) Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with changes to the structure of the brain that are also seen in the early stages of dementia, according to a study published in the European Respiratory Journal.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Related Links:

(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news
This study aims to validate an ambulatory circadian monitoring (ACM) device for the detection of sleep and wake states and apply it to the evaluation of sleep quality in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A polysomnographic validation study was conducted on a group of patients with different sleep disorders in a preliminary phase, followed by a pilot study to apply this methodology to PD patients. The ACM device makes it possible to estimate the main sleep parameters very accurately, as demonstrated by: (a) the lack of significant differences between the mean values detected by PSG and ACM in time in bed (TIB), total sl...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVES: The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) is used to screen for dementia in many Wisconsin Alzheimer Institute memory care clinics. After observing a pattern of lower scores for immediate memory than for delayed memory (immediate memory
Source: WMJ - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: WMJ Source Type: research
This study provides a possible reason why genes carrying health risks have persisted in human populations. The second found evidence for multiple variants in genes related to ageing that exhibited antagonistic pleiotropic effects. They found higher risk allele frequencies with large effect sizes for late-onset diseases (relative to early-onset diseases) and an excess of variants with antagonistic effects expressed through early and late life diseases. There also exists other recent tangible evidence of antagonistic pleiotropy in specific human genes. The SPATA31 gene has been found under strong positive genomic sele...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions:Participants with OSA and MCI were less aware of their deficits compared to those in the mild/non-OSA group, possibly reflecting a distinctive OSA-associated cognitive impairment. Our results underscore the importance of referring patients with OSA for a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment when an abnormal cognitive decline is suspected.Citation:Gagnon K, Baril AA, Montplaisir J, Carrier J, De Beaumont L, D'Aragon C, Chami S, Pelleieux S, Poirier J, Gauthier S, Lafond C, Gagnon JF, Gosselin N. Disconnection between self-reported and objective cognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.J Clin Sleep ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine : JCSM - Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: research
You might recall that researchers recently connected poor sleep with raised levels of tau in the brain. Sleep is needed to clear out tau, the amount of which rises during the active use of the brain while waking. Altered forms of tau protein can aggregate in the aging brain to form the neurofibrillary tangles that occur in later stages of Alzheimer's disease, and this might explain some of the known correlation between sleep disruption and neurodegeneration. The study here provides more data on this correlation, linking higher levels of tau with sleep apnea specifically, a common form of sleep disturbance. This is still a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
BOSTON (CBS) — A new study from the Mayo Clinic finds that people with sleep apnea may have higher accumulations of a toxic protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease in their brains. People with obstructive sleep apnea stop breathing periodically while sleeping which can cause a variety of health issues. Researchers looked at 288 people over 65 without dementia. Those whose bed partners said they stopped breathing while sleeping had a 4 1/2 percent higher level of tau in their brains than people without witnessed sleep apnea. Tau is a protein that clumps in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s which co...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Alzheimer’s Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV Sleep Apnea Source Type: news
Abstract INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate whether miR-125b targeting p38MAPK could relieve cognitive impairment of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) mice models. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The mice models were categorized into untreated control (UC), 10% continuous hypoxic (CH), 10% chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and 5% chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) groups. Morris Water Maze, spatial navigation test and spatial probe test were conducted to appraise the learning, memorizing and cognitive abilities of mice models. Moreover, miR-125b and p38MAPK expressions wer...
Source: Current Neurovascular Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Curr Neurovasc Res Source Type: research
“To die, to sleep — perchance to dream — ay, there’s the rub, for in this sleep of death what dreams may come…” – William Shakespeare, Hamlet Everyone requires sleep in order to function properly. Sleep is known to aid in healing, in memory formation, reducing stress, eliminating toxins – literally wiping the slate clean of the day’s experiences to begin anew. The subject of decades of research, sleep science continues to amass evidence of new health benefits from sleep. A Single Gene Ties Sleep to Immunity A newly discovered single gene, called nemuri, increase...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Agitation Anger Memory and Perception Psychology Research Sleep Anger Management Circadian Rhythm Immune Function Insomnia nemuri nightmare disorder Nightmares Sleep Apnea Sleep Disorder sleep quality Source Type: blogs
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — Here’s another reason why getting a good night’s sleep should be on your must-do list: Sleeping fewer than six hours a night or waking frequently raises your risk of developing damaging plaque in arteries throughout your body, not just your heart. Previous research has shown poor sleep to be strongly associated with coronary heart disease, but “This is the first study to show that objectively measured sleep is independently associated with atherosclerosis throughout the body,” José Ordovás, director of nutrition and genomics at the Jean Mayer USDA H...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN Heart Disease Sleep Tufts University Source Type: news
More News: Brain | Dementia | Neurology | Obstructive Sleep Apnea | Respiratory Medicine | Sleep Apnea | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Study