4th of July: Holiday or hazard?

America is confusing. To celebrate the birth of our nation, we eat hot dogs first created in Germany, set off fireworks invented in China, and listen to European-style orchestras play Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture commemorating a Russian military triumph (i.e., not the one the United States fought in that year), replete with the precisely-timed firing of 16 cannons, a weapon which, incidentally, was first used in battle by — you guessed it — the very nation from which we dissolved our political bonds in the first place: the English. Perhaps as a nation of immigrants that likes to appropriate any and all cultural practices it so desires, this all makes sense. As an emergency physician though, I see potential medical hazards everywhere I look. Let’s look at these 4th of July risks in reverse order. Protect your ears If you’ve decided to attend an outdoor 4th of July concert, try not sitting too close to any rows of cannons that might be present. Even though they won’t be using live ammunition, that won’t protect your eardrums. In fact, in serious blast injuries, the eardrums are often the first anatomic structure to be damaged. Eardrum (tympanic membrane) ruptures usually heal on their own, but they need evaluation by an emergency physician with close follow-up by an ear, nose, and throat specialist. Hearing loss, vertigo, and (rarely) even nerve injury can occur. Outdoor concerts of all kinds are often over-amplified. Use earplugs, ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Safety Source Type: blogs

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CONCLUSION: AEs related to EA included acupuncture-related AEs and serious AEs induced by electrical stimulation. Currently, specific stimulation conditions associated with EA-specific AEs are not identifiable due to inappropriate reporting. However, skin pigmentation, syncope or spasm, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock, cardiac emergencies, electrical burns, and potential internal organ injury are potential EA-specific AEs regarding which physicians should be cautious in clinical practice. PMID: 32418438 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Acupuncture in Medicine : journal of the British Medical Acupuncture Society - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Acupunct Med Source Type: research
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vestibular vertigo. BPPV is characterised by brief episodes of vertigo that occur with movement of the head. Almost a quarter of cases of BPPV have a traumatic cause, but no cases of t...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
You're reading 8 Nootropics to Stimulate Your Brain This Fall, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Nootropics is a term coined by Dr. Corneliu E. Giurgea to describe a class of drugs, supplements, and other synthetic and naturally occurring compounds that improve cognitive function in our brains. They’re often called “smart drugs,” as they can help us think faster and more efficiently. Although used by pretty much everyone, these nootropic supplements are especially popular among youn...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement nootropics pickthebrain Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, for the radiological assessment of TB fractures, the entire VA should be regarded as a part of the otic capsule, and delayed inner ear sequelae should be anticipated for retrolabyrinthine fracture lines that course into or through the VA. When considering treatment options in cases similar to the present, our findings suggest that surgical interventions targeting the eES (ES shunting/decompression procedures (31–33), which are used in MD with the intention to drain the hydropic endolymphatic fluid space, or to improve the fluid resorptive functions of the eES, respectively, most likely cannot work as p...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Dr. Brennan M. Spiegel and his research team at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have been experimenting with virtual reality (VR) for years. I had a fruitful and very exciting correspondence with him about moments of immersion, virtual pharmacies or how to travel to Iceland without leaving your hospital bed. Read on! VR is an area of endless possibilities VR has not just moved the imagination of science-fiction fans, but also clinical researchers and real life medical practitioners. As a doctor, you could assist in the OR without ever lifting a scalpel. If you are a medical student, you could study the human body more...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Virtual Reality in Medicine clinical practice future GC1 Healthcare Innovation technology VR Source Type: blogs
Editor’s note: These issues and more will be discussed at the 5th Annual Health Law Year in P/Review conference, to be held on January 23, 2017, at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, MA. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Conference presenters will participate in a blog series to follow here on Health Affairs Blog. Stay tuned. In the meantime, you can check out last year’s Health Law Year in P/Review blog series here. “The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry.” This phrase, adapted from the 1785 Robert Burns Poem “To a Mouse” and made as t...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Following the ACA Health Policy Lab Organization and Delivery Payment Policy Public Health 21st Century Cures Act Supreme Court The Health Law Year in P/Review Source Type: blogs
This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened.
Source: Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
By Jacqueline Andriakos Earwax is, well, pretty gross, so it's no wonder most of us reach for cotton swabs on a regular basis. But here's the rub: There's a good chance you're putting your ears and your hearing at risk with every wax removal attempt. Why? The eardrum and the little bones of the middle ear--called ossicles--are easy to damage (ouch), and may even require surgery to fix (double ouch), explains Boris Chernobilsky, MD, assistant clinical professor of otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. "In the worst case scenario, damage to the ossicles can result in a leak of f...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion Meticulous patient histories, consistent surgical routines, careful radiologic examinations, and frequent patient visits can help surgeons control these types of complications. No Level Assigned This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Ta...
Source: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Source Type: research
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Source: Annals of Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
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