Falls and fall-related injuries among US adults aged 65 or older with chronic kidney disease - Kistler BM, Khubchandani J, Jakubowicz G, Wilund K, Sosnoff J.

INTRODUCTION: Falls are among the leading causes of injury and death among adults aged 65 or older. People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of falling and of having a serious injury from falls. However, information is limited about r...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

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Publication date: November 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Akhtar AshfaqOf late, fewer residents are choosing nephrology as a career. Contributing factors may include lack of prestige, uncertain potential of future income, and poor work-life balance. Some current nephrologists are considering transitioning to another career for similar reasons. For those who decide that practicing nephrology is no longer appealing, there are many available avenues where they can use their nephrology expertise and still have a successful future. A leadership role in the pharmaceutical industry is...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Douglas S. Johnson, Klemens B. MeyerThe leaders of 20th century kidney failure treatment took chances; 21st century leaders of integrated kidney care must do the same. Some risks are clinical, some are organizational, and some are financial. Decent and constructive leadership entails humility. A working practitioner is a better leader. Effective leaders empower their employees and collaborators to lead and encourage them to work together. Integrated kidney care leadership supports exchange of ideas within and among organ...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Wendy Weinstock Brown, Sharon AndersonWomen and men tend to take different paths to leadership, with men being more intentional. When women do undertake leadership activities, they tend to be surprised by how much they enjoy it. Women's leadership styles tend to be more collaborative and inclusive. Women are used to multitasking and tend to persist under difficult circumstances. The nephrology manpower crisis affects both men and women, although some of the drivers are different. There is a persistent and well-known pay ...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Belinda Jim, Jerry YeeMentorship has always been important in medicine. In fact, one can argue that that is how doctors are trained. Moreover, mentorship has been proven to preserve and elevate those who wish to pursue academic medicine. In nephrology, mentorship has become paramount, as interest in the field has declined during this decade. In this article, we will delineate how mentorship impacts physician careers, describe different types of mentors and their characteristics, and summarize responsibilities of mentors ...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
This article explores the impact of nephrology leadership on government decision making and the important role of the nephrologist in advocacy and public policy at the Federal, state, and regional levels.
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Sharmeela Saha, Jay B. WishThe responsibilities of a dialysis unit medical director are specified in the ESRD Conditions for Coverage and encompass multiple quality, safety, and educational domains. Many of these responsibilities require leadership skills that are neither intuitive nor acquired as part of the medical director's training. An effective medical director is able to shape the culture of the dialysis facility such that patients and staff feel free to communicate their concerns regarding suboptimal processes wi...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Nelson Kopyt, Ravindra BolluPrivate practice is entering an era of diminishing reimbursement and increasing overhead associated with federally mandated payment reforms resulting in a need to move from the traditional fee-for-service to a value-based model, changes that place financial and organizational strain on nephrology practices. In addition, the changing geopolitical scene is one of mergers and consolidation of health care networks, which in turn are developing their own insurance plans or partnering with commercia...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Michael Gitman, Alessandro Bellucci, Steven FishbaneNephrologists, perhaps more than other physicians, are drawn to health-care leadership positions. In this article, we consider reasons that nephrologists are uniquely suited to serve in these roles. We briefly review key aspects of leadership principles and skills. Finally, we discuss routes to non-nephrology leadership for younger members of the profession.
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
This article reviews the roles, responsibilities, and opportunities of the position as established in a midsize nonprofit dialysis provider.
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2018Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 6Author(s): Eleanor LedererThe position of chief of a division of nephrology in an academic medical center is a hands-on job, offering the opportunity to influence the future of the field through the creation of unique clinical, research, and education programs. Today, most academic centers face significant financial challenges, thus the division chief must develop a variety of skills to accomplish his or her goals. Interactions and relationships with the leadership of the academic center, including the hospital executives, can faci...
Source: Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
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