Link found between obesity and Alzheimer ’s disease

Normal ageing, combined with a diet that leads to obesity, may contribute to the development to Alzheimer’s, according to a study inPhysiological Reports.Medical Xpress
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 5 July 2018Source: Alzheimer's &DementiaAuthor(s): Mark A. Espeland, Owen Carmichael, Sevil Yasar, Christina Hugenschmidt, William Hazzard, Kathleen M. Hayden, Stephen R. Rapp, Rebecca Neiberg, Karen C. Johnson, Siobhan Hoscheidt, Michelle M. Mielke, Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) Research GroupAbstractIntroductionType 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity may increase risks for cognitive decline as individuals age. It is unknown whether this results in different prevalences of cognitive impairment for women and men.MethodsThe Action for Health in Diabetes, a randomized controll...
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
DiscussionLater life MCI and DEM were independently associated with midlife vascular risk factors and midlife cognition.
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
This study was supported by grants from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health (R01 AG040211 and P30 AG008051), the Morris and Alma Schapiro Fund and the New York State Department of Health.About the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine:FAU ’s Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is one of approximately 151 accredited medical schools in the U.S.About Florida Atlantic University:Florida Atlantic University, established in 1961, officially opened its doors in 1964 as the fifth public university in Florida. Today, the University, with an annual economic impact of $6.3 billion, serves mo...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers alzheimers research Cognition cognitive performance dementia fat science skinny fat various cognition tests Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 5 July 2018Source: Alzheimer's &DementiaAuthor(s): Mark A. Espeland, Owen Carmichael, Sevil Yasar, Christina Hugenschmidt, William Hazzard, Kathleen M. Hayden, Stephen R. Rapp, Rebecca Neiberg, Karen C. Johnson, Siobhan Hoscheidt, Michelle M. Mielke, Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) Research GroupAbstractIntroductionType 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity may increase risks for cognitive decline as individuals age. It is unknown whether this results in different prevalences of cognitive impairment for women and men.MethodsThe Action for Health in Diabetes, a randomized controll...
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
DiscussionLater life MCI and DEM were independently associated with midlife vascular risk factors and midlife cognition.
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
(Florida Atlantic University) A first-of-its-kind study has found that 'skinny fat' -- the combination of low muscle mass and strength in the context of high fat mass -- may be an important predictor of cognitive performance in older adults. Using data from a series of community-based aging and memory studies, researchers assessed the relationship of sarcopenic obesity or 'skinny fat' with performance on various cognition tests. Results show that sarcopenic obesity was associated with the lowest performance on global cognition.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
A recent study shows how an obesity-inducing diet — high in sugar and fats — boosts the detrimental effect of natural aging, increasing Alzheimer's risk.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is associated with preclinical AD imaging markers of neurodegeneration, but not with amyloid. PMID: 29953971 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Source Type: research
Conclusion: Multimorbidity is associated with preclinical AD imaging markers of neurodegeneration, but not with amyloid.Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2018;45:272 –281
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
More News: Alzheimer's | Diets | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Endocrinology | Nutrition | Obesity | Study