Diagnostic values of C-reactive protein and complete blood cell to identify invasive bacterial infection in young febrile infants

Newborn infants younger than 3 months old with a fever are frequently evaluated for the risk of invasive bacterial infections (IBIs), which include bacteremia and/or bacterial meningitis, in the pediatric emergency department (PED). The purpose of this study was to determine the individual complete blood cell count and biochemistry levels associated with IBIs in febrile infants.
Source: Pediatrics and Neonatology - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

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To determine effects of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1C cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral escape, CSF/plasma viral discordance, and drug resistance mutation (DRM) discordance between CSF and plasma compartments, we compared CSF and plasma viral load (VL) and DRMs in individuals with HIV-associated CM in Botswana. This cross-sectional study utilized 45 paired CSF/plasma samples from participants in a CM treatment trial (2014–2016). HIV-1 VL was determined and HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase genotyping performed. DRMs were determined using the Stanford HIV database. CSF vir...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Observational Study Source Type: research
In conclusion, these bioinformatic data uncovered the network targets and mechanisms of calycosin-anti-meningitis. And the current findings indicated that the vital targets might be used as potent biomarkers for detecting meningitis. PMID: 33031061 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Aging - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Aging (Albany NY) Source Type: research
Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) remains a global public health concern and affects all age groups. If acquired during infancy or childhood, permanent neurofunctional deficits including cognitive impairment, cereb...
Source: Journal of Neuroinflammation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
AbstractIn recent years, the frequency of infections due to saprophytic fungi has increased.Cryptococcus laurentii, recently classified asPapiliotrema laurentii, is responsible for fungemia, meningitis, and superficial infections. Here, we report the first case of cutaneousPapiliotrema (Cryptococcus)laurentii infection in a 23-year-old Caucasian woman affected by an autoimmune thyroiditis with hypothyroidism. Impairments of the immune system are often associated with unusual fungal infections, which cannot be neglected. The isolate strain was susceptible to Amphotericin B while resistant to fluconazole, itraconazole, voric...
Source: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
SUMMARY: When preparing for the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and its effects on the CNS, radiologists should be familiar with neuroimaging appearances in past zoonotic infectious disease outbreaks. Organisms that have crossed the species barrier from animals to humans include viruses such as Hendra, Nipah, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, and influenza, as well as bacteria and others. Brain CT and MR imaging findings have included cortical abnormalities, microinfarction in the white matter, large-vessel occlusion, and features of meningitis. In particular, the high sensitivity of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in det...
Source: American Journal of Neuroradiology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: ADULT BRAIN Source Type: research
Abstract Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are a leading cause of mortality in low- and middle-income countries. We studied the spectrum, aetiology and outcome of CNS infections in 401 consecutive patients aged ≥12 years admitted at the medical emergency centre of PGIMER, Chandigarh, India. An aetiological diagnosis was made in 365 (91.0%) patients, with 149 (40.8%) microbiologically confirmed cases. CNS tuberculosis was the most prevalent cause (51.5%), followed by viral meningoencephalitis (13.9%), community-acquired bacterial meningitis (9.7%), cryptococcal meningitis (6.2%), scrub typhus mening...
Source: Tropical Doctor - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Trop Doct Source Type: research
Neuropediatrics DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1715482Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonosis worldwide. It is still endemic in many regions of the world. A 6-year-old female was admitted to the emergency department (ED) due to a sudden change in consciousness, urinary incontinence, vomiting, and difficulty in walking. Neurological examination demonstrated abducens nerve paralysis, mild-to-moderate motor deficit in hemiparesis in the left arm. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a hemorrhagic focus at the right frontal lobe and thrombosis in the superior sagittal sinus of the brain. The diagnosis of neurobrucellosis was co...
Source: Neuropediatrics - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research
Abstract Intravenous fluids are frequently used in hospitalized children. Hypotonic fluids have been the standard of care in pediatrics for many years. This might be explained by the empiricism of early recommendations favoring fluids with dextrose, but an insufficient amount of sodium. The risk of hyponatremia (
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
Authors: Nakamura Y, Uemura T, Kawata Y, Hirose B, Yamauchi R, Shimohama S Abstract An 81-year-old man with a history of gingival bleeding presented with a fever, headache, and drowsiness. His mouth and full dentures were unsanitary. Laboratory tests revealed Streptococcus oralis meningitis caused by odontogenic bacteremia. We reviewed eight reported cases, including the present case, because S. oralis meningitis is rare. Our review indicated that S. oralis meningitis needs to be considered when encountering cases of a fever, disturbance of consciousness, and headache with episodes of possible odontogenic bacteremi...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
This report presents the case of a 10-month-old infant who had an unusual presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis with no cough, poor growth or documented temperature>38 C despite extensive right lung involvement with lung abscess formation and pleural effusions. Inflammatory markers were minimally deranged. The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was confirmed based on positive tuberculosis polymerase chain reaction test. The child made a successful clinical and radiological recovery upon completion of anti-tuberculosis drug regimen for six months. This report brings to light that it is crucial for clinicians to have a ...
Source: Respiratory Care - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Respir Med Case Rep Source Type: research
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