20 years of researching stroke through audit.

This article records and reviews some questions that have been answered using data from the audit: Is the rate of institutional care after rehabilitation a possible measure of outcome? Does stroke unit care in routine practice give the benefits shown in randomized controlled trials? How is the quality of stroke care affected by a patient's age and the time of their stroke? Do patient-reported measures match those obtained from the professionals recording of processes of care? How do the processes of care after stroke affect mortality? Is thrombolysis safe to use in patients over the age of 80? Do staffing levels matter? Does assessing the safety of swallowing really make a difference? Do clinicians make rational decisions about end-of-life care in patients with haemorrhage? Does socioeconomic status influence the risk of stroke, outcome after stroke and the quality of stroke care? How much does stroke really cost in England, Wales and Northern Ireland? The article concludes that this national audit has improved stroke care across the United Kingdom, has given answers to important questions that could not be answered in any other way and has shown that benefits found in research do generalize into real clinical benefits in day-to-day practice. PMID: 29932011 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Clin Rehabil Source Type: research

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Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Authors: Kimpton M, Siegal DM Abstract A 77-year-old man with atrial fibrillation and a CHA2DS2Vasc score of 6 for hypertension, age, diabetes, and previous stroke is brought to the emergency department with decreased level of consciousness. He is anticoagulated with rivaroxaban (a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor [FXaI]) and received his last dose about 4 hours before presentation. Urgent computed tomography of the head shows intracerebral hemorrhage. Because of his previous stroke, the patient's family is concerned about treating the bleed with pharmacological agents that may increase the risk of stroke. What are ...
Source: Hematology ASH Education Program - Category: Hematology Tags: Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program Source Type: research
Conclusions: Stroke is uncommon in cirrhotic patients. However, considering a positive relationship of liver cirrhosis with subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, the prophylactic strategy may be selectively adopted in cirrhotic patients.
Source: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: LIVER, PANCREAS & BILIARY TRACT: Original Articles Source Type: research
We describe 2-month and 2-year neurological outcomes in a prospective cohort.
Source: Pediatric Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a substantially higher risk of thromboembolism, particularly stroke events, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Oral anticoagulation (OAC), while effective in reducing embolic events in AF patients, is associated with an increased bleeding risk. Thus, not all patients with AF are candidates for OAC and some are only candidates for OAC in the short term. Of the available nonpharmacologic strategies for the management of AF, left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) has emerged as a potential approach for reducing the risk of systemic thromboembolism in AF patients eligi...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
ConclusionsIn AF patients who survived an ICH, restarting OAC was not associated with a greater risk of recurrent ICH. Evidence from randomized controlled studies is needed to further clarify the clinical benefit of restarting OAC in this high-risk population. Further evaluation of which individuals benefit from restarting OAC is also needed to provide more clinical guidance.
Source: American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
AbstractPrevious studies showed that complement activation is associated with poor functional outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We investigated whether complement activation is underlying brain injury after aneurysmal SAH (n = 7) and if it is an appropriate treatment target. We investigated complement expression in brain tissue of aneurysmal SAH patients (n = 930) and studied the role of common genetic variants in C3 and C5 genes in outcome. We analyzed plasma levels (n = 229) to identify the functionality of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with ...
Source: Translational Stroke Research - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions: ENG promotes the normal balance of VEGF signalling in quiescent ECs to maintain vessel calibre, an essential function in conditions of increased VEGF expression such as local hypoxia or inflammation. In the absence of endothelial ENG increased sensitivity to VEGF drives abnormal endothelial proliferation in local regions of high VEGF expression, leading to AVM formation and a rapid injurious impact on heart function. PMID: 31805812 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Circulation Research - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circ Res Source Type: research
AbstractBackground and AimStroke remains a significant complication of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy. We performed a single ‐center retrospective study evaluating patients undergoing first‐time HeartWare HVAD (Medtronic Inc) or HeartMate 3 (Abbott Inc) implantation from September 2009‐February 2018.MethodsExclusion criteria were age24  hours with corresponding radiographic evidence. Risk factors evaluated included demographics, medical comorbidities, heart failure etiology, LVAD indication, INTERMACS profile, and device type. Univariate predictors (P 
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Cardiac dysfunction (CD) importantly contributes to mortality in trauma patients, who survive their initial injuries following successful hemostatic resuscitation. This poor outcome has been correlated with elevated biomarkers of myocardial injury, but the pathophysiology triggering this CD remains unknown. We investigated the pathophysiology of acute CD after trauma using a mouse model of trauma hemorrhage shock (THS)-induced CD with echocardiographic guidance of fluid resuscitation, to assess the THS impact on myocardial integrity and function. Mice were subjected to trauma (soft tissue and bone fracture) and different d...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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