How the polio virus is being used to combat brain cancer

There's a surprising upside to the virus that causes crippling polio disease, new research indicates.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In this study it was assumed that there was no immunity following resolution of natural infection. The modeling demonstrated that a vaccine of moderate efficacy could have a significant impact on the prevalence of gonorrhea if strategically implemented (23). While encouraging it does, of course, depend on the availability of a vaccine. From Ecological Data to Evidence The epidemiological evidence from Cuba, Brazil, and New Zealand demonstrates that N. meningitidis OMV vaccines are possibly able to provide some broader protection against meningococcal disease (17, 24), particularly in older children and adults (25). These...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include hospital at home, using a virus to treat brain cancer, updated osteoporosis guidelines, and an artificial pancreas in hospitalized patients
Source: MedPage Today Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news
Some 21% of patients with advanced brain cancer treated with a modified polio vaccine were alive after three years, compared with 4% of patients with similar tumors who received standard therapies, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news
An ancient scourge -- the polio virus -- may be an unexpected friend to people battling one of the deadliest brain cancers, new research shows.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Doctors using the polio virus to treat aggressive brain tumors called glioblastomas report promising results. Sen. John McCain has this type of cancer, and so did Sen. Ted Kennedy. Of 61 patients treated in one study, 21 percent were still alive at the three-year mark. That's compared with just four percent of patients who received standard cancer treatment. Dr. David Agus, director of USC Norris Westside Cancer Center, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the treatment. He also weighs in on a study that showed flight attendants had a higher cancer prevalence than the general population.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Survival was better than expected for patients in a small study at Duke University who were given genetically modified poliovirus, which helped their bodies attack the cancer, doctors report.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
CHICAGO (Reuters) - Some 21 percent of patients with advanced brain cancer treated with a modified polio vaccine were alive after three years, compared with 4 percent of patients with similar tumors who received standard therapies, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
The idea that viruses may be co-opted to do good rather than harm isn’t entirely new; researchers have been attempting to harness the power of viruses and bacteria for more than a century. Vaccines are the shining example of using bad bugs to do good in priming the immune system to fight disease. But disease-causing viruses aren’t always easy to corral, and attempts to use them to activate the immune system against things other than fellow bacteria and viruses — including cancer, for example — have not been so successful. There is only one approved virus-based treatment for cancer, which uses herpes...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime Source Type: news
TUESDAY, June 26, 2018 -- An ancient scourge -- the polio virus -- may be an unexpected friend to people battling one of the deadliest brain cancers, new research shows. The new therapy uses a tweaked, harmless form of the polio virus to...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Just as the President of the United States undergoes an annual checkup and physical every year, it makes sense that they should undergo an annual checkup for their mental health too. Since mental health is of equal importance to one’s physical health, it makes little sense to ignore it and pretend it’s not important. Or worse, to act as though a person’s mental health either doesn’t exist or can’t be objectively measured. It’s time for the President to undergo annual mental health checkups, coinciding with their physical exams. It goes without saying that most actual smart people don&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Policy and Advocacy Psychology Donald Trump fitness for office litmus test mental exam Mental Fitness president's fitness president's mental health should we Source Type: blogs
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