Role of Gut Microbiome in Regulating Reproduction and Its Impact on Fertility Status in Women Living with and Without HIV (R01 - Clinical Trial Optional)

Funding Opportunity PA-18-838 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications from the scientific community to support outstanding research related to the role of the gut microbiome in regulating metabolism and reproduction, and its impact on the fertility status. The overarching goal is to gain fundamental insight into the possible role of the gut microbiome in regulating reproduction through HPG, HPA, and HPT axes in the brain. The results of the study could lead to development of diagnostic markers (signature microbiomes) for reproductive and metabolic failure. The project is pertinent to multiple portfolios in the Fertility and Infertility Branch, e.g., basic ovarian biology, fertility preservation, assisted reproductive technology, spermatogenesis and sperm function, and therapeutic interventions to infertility. The emphasis on the gut microbiome and its impact on reproduction through its effects on HPG, HPA, and HPT axes leading to obesity, metabolic syndrome, stress disorders, infection and anxiety is also of interest to the Maternal and Pediatric infectious disease Branch, Pediatric Growth and Nutrition Branch and IDDB.
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding

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Funding Opportunity PA-18-839 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to encourage applications from the scientific community to support outstanding research related to the role of the gut microbiome in regulating metabolism and reproduction, and its impact on the fertility status. The overarching goal is to gain fundamental insight into the possible role of the gut microbiome in regulating reproduction through HPG, HPA, and HPT axes in the brain. The results of the study could lead to development of diagnostic markers (signature microbiomes) for reproduct...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
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