Food items we should avoid “ like the plague ” …

I just read a very interesting interview with/article about a food poisoning lawyer (imagine that…!!!) who shares his knowledge about food, potentially contaminated food. And some of it isn’t so obvious. That is why I’m posting the link to the article, as a warning/reminder to those of us who have weakened immune systems: goo.gl/NG3oty I never buy prepackaged (washed? Hah!) salad, e.g., or anything that has been cut and washed by others. I never go near salad bars, no matter how clean the restaurant looks. Bacteria bacteria bacteria! Better be safe than sorry… After my SMM diagnosis, I began growing my own sprouts, which contain lots of vitamins and minerals (even protein and so on). Until…one day I read about the risk of Salmonella and E.coli contamination, and that completely killed my sprout-growing enthusiasm. I gave my sprouter away. Just a few days ago, in fact, there was an outbreak of Salmonella in Southern Australia caused by alfalfa sprouts. Yes, okay, these were store-bought, but still…I’m not taking the risk. No sprouts in my sandwich, thank you very much!!! Anyway, the above interview/article may surprise you. Or not! Do you have any additions/suggestions? Thanks! Have a great Sunday! Ciao!
Source: Margaret's Corner - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Blogroll food poisoning sprouts Source Type: blogs

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Conclusion Starter cultures are an important tool that contributes to ensure the safety of fermented meat products. Indeed, the microorganisms that constitute starter cultures may inhibit or reduce the growth of spoilage and/or pathogenic populations through mechanisms, such as production of certain metabolites or competitive exclusion. Thus, the use of starter cultures may reduce the need for chemical additives, such as nitrites and nitrates. Furthermore, the lower residual levels of nitrates and nitrites detected in fermented meat products inoculated with starter cultures are due to the ability of starters to metabolize...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
This study provides new insight into the characterization of foodborne C. perfringens and highlights the potential of WGS for the investigation of FBOs. Introduction Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, known as an important causative agent of foodborne and non-foodborne gastroenteritis (Grass et al., 2013). The ability of this bacterium to form resistant spores contributes to its survival in many environmental niches, including soil, sewage, foods, and the intestinal microbiota of humans and animals (Xiao, 2014; Li et al., 2016). C. perfringens can cause necro...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
ConclusionMaintaining food safety during mass gatherings is a major challenge for public health authorities. The Food Safety and Standards Act (2006) in India brings the food consumed during religious gatherings such as 'prasad' and 'langar' under its purview and comprehensively addresses this issue.
Source: Medical Journal Armed Forces India - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
The holidays can be a time of joy, but they can also be a challenge. Just think of all the cookies: delicious — but definitely not to be eaten before they are baked. That’s the word from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which issued a reminder before the holidays for people to “say no to raw dough.” Raw flour can contain the bacteria E. coli, and raw eggs can carry the risk of salmonella poisoning. Symptoms for salmonella poisoning can include diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps hours to a few days after exposure, the CDC explains, while E. coli symptoms range from severe stoma...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized food and drink Source Type: news
(CBS Local/ CBS Baltimore)– Making cookies this holiday season? Resist the raw cookie dough. The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention is using the holiday season to remind people that raw cookie dough can cause illnesses like e. coli and salmonella. In 2016, an e. coli outbreak linked to raw cookie dough sickened 63 people, the CDC reported. The CDC also asks people to check for recalled flour products, because flour often sits on the shelf for a while before it’s used. Cookie dough also contains raw eggs, which can be linked to salmonella poisoning. The CDC suggests these steps to keep you and your famil...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Offbeat Local TV talkers Source Type: news
An outbreak of infections linked to bagged romaine lettuce has left salad lovers confused. Here are answers to common questions about leafy greens.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Salads Food Contamination and Poisoning Lettuce Hygiene and Cleanliness Salmonella (Bacteria) Restaurants Agriculture and Farming E Coli (Bacteria) Source Type: news
The World Health Organization is issuing a warning about a group of deadly bacteria: Recently, the WHO released its first-ever list of “priority pathogens,” a list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that the organization says pose the greatest threat to human health. The list is divided into three categories: critical-, high- and medium-priority. Three pathogens made it into the critical-priority group. These bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and pose a high risk to people in hospitals and nursing homes, the WHO says. Multidrug-resistant bacteria, sometimes called “superbugs,” are a ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Jo Robertson was recently inside the home of a dead man she’d never met. There were messages on the answerphone, so she pressed play and a male American voice cheerfully said, “Hi, how are you?” The next message was the same voice, asking if the man was OK because he hadn’t called him back. A third message said, “What’s going on? Please get back to me”. Finally, the friend’s fourth message said, “Something must have happened. If anyone is listening to this please contact me.” Jo wasn’t trespassing. She was in the dead man’s home because she’s an ...
Source: UNISON Health care news - Category: UK Health Authors: Tags: Magazine health and safety local government Source Type: news
Conclusion This laboratory study principally demonstrates that salad leaf juice – released from salad leaves when they are damaged or broken – supports the growth of salmonella bacteria, even at fridge temperature. If leaves are contaminated with salmonella, this isn't removed by washing in water. The results don't show that all packaged salad leaves are contaminated with gut bacteria like salmonella. What they do show is that if the bags have been contaminated with gut bacteria, these bacteria will replicate, even in the fridge, and there's little you can do to remove them. The best thing to do is to throw t...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news
How your furry friends could make you sick You know you can't resist looking at them: those videos starring adorable kittens or puppies, hatching eagle chicks, little ducklings, baby pandas. They show cute animals rolling around with infants, licking someone's face, or doing something unusual. You might even have seen CNN's report on an emotional support duck walking down the aisle of an airplane. Why do these videos go viral? Maybe because "animals can melt the human heart, tickle the funny bone or bring us to tears," as the Associated Press explained last year. They can also lure us into forgetting that n...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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