After Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain, it ’s time to shift on suicide

Surviving suicide loss is difficult. And in some sense, the resulting grief is open-ended. I am a mother and doctor whose two sons died by suicide associated with psychotic bipolar disorder. My ever-present sensitivity to the fierce loss of death by suicide is again touched when I hear of death by suicide. The suicides of Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade triggered in me a renewed feeling of grief. Like so many, I felt I knew Anthony Bourdain. “No Reservations” was my introduction to Bourdain. As a fellow traveler and foodie, I fell in love with his eccentric style. Later, he drove me crazy when he was drunk and had an alcohol-induced blackout during the “Sicily” episode of Parts Unknown. But, afterward, I worried about him. Now, I will miss him. Yes, Bourdain himself fit into categories for increased suicide risk: a white man in his 60s, divorced, with a history of addiction. Although, as I live with daily, somehow the rational explanations are not entirely satisfying for the loss. Brain illness, mental illness is the underlying factor in 90 percent of suicides. As physicians, we are fortunate to understand this intrinsic vulnerability better than most. Therefore, I believe we have a particular responsibility to help destigmatize these brain illnesses. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how.
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

   When future NFL player Erik Coleman was eleven years old, he discovered that both of his parents were addicts (one to alcohol, one to harder drugs). This was a traumatic discovery, but made worse when, one day, he returned home from school to find his father had moved out. Erik shares this and more with us, including how this affected him as a child and as an adult, even through his years playing in the NFL. He shares his thoughts on what is most important for children of addicts to know, and of what happened to his parents later in life. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! Show High...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Family General The Psych Central Show Erik Coleman Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Comorbidity with substance use disorder is often found in patients suffering from bipolar disorder. Clinicians should conduct a thorough assessment of patient history to uncover substance use disorder, as the treatment of one disorder will be incomplete without fully addressing the other.
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Research Addiction Recovery Alcohol Abuse Bipolar Disorder comorbid Depressive Episode Drug Abuse Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs
What is a Co-Occuring disorder? The coexistence of both a mental health disorder and a substance abuse use disorder is referred to as a co-occurring disorder. Any combination of mental health and addiction can be referred to as having a co-occuring disorder. The combinations can be seemingly endless, and can even include more than one of either a mental disorder or an addiction. Combinations may include depression and alcoholism, anorexia and cocaine addiction, bipolar disorder and heroin addiction and the list goes on. Surprisingly, as many as 6 in 10 substance abusers also have at least one other mental disorder. There i...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Treatment and Program Resources ADHD Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Anxiety Behavioral Addictions Depression Depression Treatment Drinking Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eat Source Type: blogs
How does depression cause addiction? Addiction is a common place issue amongst people who are experiencing a depressive disorder. Alcohol is classified as a central nervous system depressant. This means it will actually trigger typical symptoms of depression like sadness, lethargy and hopelessness. Many people who are depressed reach for alcohol and drugs as a way to numb the pain. This tends to lead to depression and addiction further feeding each other and each condition making the other amplified. When someone is experiencing both addiction and depression, it is often referred to as a dual diagnosis. This diagnosis can ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcoholism Anxiety Behavioral Addictions Depression Depression Treatment Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Dual Diagnosis and Eating Disorder Treatment Sober Source Type: blogs
Stigma is a sticky, two-sided issue, one that we talk about often in our field of psychiatry.  Many things are stigmatized. While mental illness is an obvious one --and I'll come back to this-- many other things are stigmatized as well.  To name just a few: drug use, smoking, being a criminal, going to jail, behaving in a disruptive way, smelling badly and being physically unkempt in certain settings, begging for money in public, being on public assistance (in certain circles), beating your children (again, in certain circles), incest (in all cultures), being morbidly obese (especially when it happens in someone ...
Source: Shrink Rap - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Migration was associated with a higher prevalence of all anxiety disorders, in the first, second and third generation, and associated with more psychiatric comorbidities. Moreover, the prevalence increased across generations, and was significantly higher among third-generation migrants, in comparison to first-generation.
Source: Journal of Psychiatric Research - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Although dual disorders (DD), addiction, and other mental disorders (MDs) are common in patients using mental health and addiction treatment services, they are not routinely screened for and diagnosed by most health experts. The aim of this article was to present the most relevant findings from the Madrid study on DD in a clinical sample from the Community of Madrid mental health and substance misuse service care networks. The sample consisted of 837 outpatients from Madrid: 208 patients from mental health services and 629 from substance misuse services. We used the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to e...
Source: Addictive Disorders and Their Treatment - Category: Addiction Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusion: This novel technology discriminates and quantifies subtle differences in behavior and neurological impairments in subjects afflicted with neurological injury/disease. KINARM assessments can be incorporated into multi-center trials (e.g., monitoring stroke motor recovery: NCT02928393). Further studies will determine if KINARM Labs can demonstrate a clinical effect with fewer subjects over a shorter trial period. Disclosures/funding: Dr. Stephen Scott is the inventor of KINARM and CSO of BKIN Technologies.   Multiplexed mass spectrometry assay identifies neurodegeneration biomarkers in CSF Presenter: Chelsky...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Assessment Tools biomarkers Cognition Current Issue Drug Development General Genetics Medical Issues Neurology Patient Assessment Psychopharmacology Scales Special Issues Supplements Trial Methodology clinical trials CNS Su Source Type: research
People have said this to me many times over the years. Here’s another Wheat Belly Basics conversation for newcomers or a refresher for the seasoned Wheat Belly follower. One of the reason that wheat and related grains are such effective causes of weight gain is that they contain a protein, gliadin, that, upon digestion, yields opioid peptides that bind to the opiate receptors of the human brain. These opioid peptides are responsible for generating addictive relationships with food, as well as behavioral and emotional effects. Stop eating grains and an opiate withdrawal syndrome ensues: nausea, headache, fatigue, depr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle addiction appetite stimulant binge eating bulimia Detox eating disorders gluten gluten-free grain-free grains health opiates opioids Weight Loss wellness withdrawal Source Type: blogs
Therapy is so much more than sitting on a couch. Misconceptions abound about what it means to talk to a mental health professional. The need to talk about your emotions is seen as something to poke fun at, weak or shameful. That stigma is often why people don’t seek help in the first place. But here’s the reality: Therapy is an incredibly useful tool that helps with a range of issues, from anxiety to sleep to relationships to trauma. Research shows that it’s incredibly effective in helping people manage mental health conditions and experts say that it’s worth it even if you don’t have a medica...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
More News: Addiction | Alcoholism | Bipolar | Blogging | Brain | Depression | General Medicine | Mania | Men | Neurology | Psychiatry | Suicide