Book Review: Ending The Diet Mindset

A quick survey of obesity statistics and annual spending on diet and weight loss products in this country tells us two things: we have a crisis of obesity, and the way in which we are attempting to treat it is not working. According to Becca Clegg, a psychotherapist, eating disorder specialist and author of Ending The Diet Mindset: Reclaim a Healthy and Balanced Relationship with Food and Body Image the reason is that diets cause us to eat more, not less. “Dieting leads us to feel terrible about ourselves, belittles our self-worth, decreases our motivation, and harms our bodies in the process,” writes Clegg. Dieting also leads to destructive mindsets which drive our attitudes, beliefs, emotions, and behavior. In short, dieting turns us into a different person. We may adopt a pattern of deprivation where we are not allowed to eat what we really want, putting all of our favorite foods off limits. The result, like Newton’s third law of motions, is an equal and opposite reaction. “If you go on a diet that feels in any way restrictive, your automatic reaction is going to be equal in intensity, but in the opposite direction of that feeling of restriction. In other words, the more deprived you feel, the more the urge to eat will grow,” writes Clegg. Overcoming deprivation starts with its opposite: abundance. Instead of teaching ourselves that food should be limited, we must experience food being plentiful – as well as ourselves feeling p...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Binge Eating Book Reviews Bulimia Eating Disorders Healthy Living Mindfulness Self-Help Diet Book diet mindset ending diets Source Type: news

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American culture seems obsessed with dieting. According to the Centers for Disease Control, almost 70% of Americans over the age of 20 are overweight, including 35% that are considered obese. In kids and teens, it’s 17%. Meanwhile, the cultural ideal is to be fit, thin, and trim. The quest for body perfection has created a U.S. weight loss industry that was estimated to be worth $68.2 billion in 2017. In 2018, the fitness industry topped $30 billion. While 45 million Americans go on a diet every year and 54 million Americans paid for gym memberships last year, the sad reality is that most diets fail and most pe...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Eating Disorders Exercise Healthy Living Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder Disordered Eating food aversion Muscle Dysmorphia Orthorexia unhealthy dieting Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Findings based on this nationally representative sample are that overvaluation was associated with greater functional impairment within BED, and BED+OV reported greater impairment than BN in interference with normal activities but less impairment related to mental health. The increased impairment associated with BED+OV provides support for overvaluation as a diagnostic specifier for BED. PMID: 31265763 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Obesity - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Tags: Obesity (Silver Spring) Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) is a self-report questionnaire for the assessment of addiction-like consumption of high-calorie, processed foods. The original scale was developed in 2009 and —for its tenth anniversary—we now review studies using its revised version—the YFAS 2.0.Recent FindingsThe 11 symptoms of food addiction as measured with the YFAS 2.0 demonstrated high internal reliability and a unidimensional structure in several studies, supporting construct validity. Similar to the original YFAS, highest prevalence rates of YFAS 2.0 diagnoses were found in individuals ...
Source: Current Addiction Reports - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
AbstractHuman biological system provides innumerable neuroendocrine inputs for food intake control, with effects on appetite ’s modulation and the satiety signs. Its regulation is very complex, engaging several molecular interactions with many tissues, hormones, and neural circuits. Thus, signaling molecules that control food intake are critical for normal energy homeostasis and a deregulation of these pathways can lead to eating disorders and obesity. In line of this, genetic factors have a significantly influence of the regulation of neural circuits controlling the appetite and satiety pathways, as well as the regu...
Source: Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Abstract Human biological system provides innumerable neuroendocrine inputs for food intake control, with effects on appetite's modulation and the satiety signs. Its regulation is very complex, engaging several molecular interactions with many tissues, hormones, and neural circuits. Thus, signaling molecules that control food intake are critical for normal energy homeostasis and a deregulation of these pathways can lead to eating disorders and obesity. In line of this, genetic factors have a significantly influence of the regulation of neural circuits controlling the appetite and satiety pathways, as well as the r...
Source: ENDOCR REV - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Rev Endocr Metab Disord Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThis review is intended to describe the role of brain stimulation in knowledge generation, treatment, and prevention of clinical disorders of indulgent eating (e.g., obesity, bulimia, binge eating).Recent FindingsAlthough both invasive and non-invasive variants of brain stimulation have been evaluated as treatments for disorders of indulgent eating, only non-invasive variants have been studied extensively. Among these, both repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) have been evaluated in randomized trials; recent findings for both have been pr...
Source: Current Addiction Reports - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
ConclusionOur findings demonstrate abnormalities in brain networks involved in salience attribution, self ‐referential processing, and cognitive control in bulimic‐type eating disorders. Together with our observation of functional connectivity differences between BED and BN, this study offers a differentiated account of both similarities and differences regarding brain connectivity in BED and BN.
Source: Brain and Behavior - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
I went for a run because I had eaten a small, organic, dark chocolate cookie the day before and I felt that I had to punish myself. It was habitual for me to punish myself with strenuous, caloric compensation cardio whenever I felt guilty for enjoying life by eating tasty foods. When I placed first in a fitness competition, my fitness goals went up a notch. Winning the competition was one thing, but people complimenting me on my extra lean body pressured me to stay that way. I couldn’t allow myself to look “bigger” again, and “bigger” really meant not seeing my defined ab muscles. It was a su...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anorexia Binge Eating Bulimia Eating Disorders Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Personal Spirituality Fitness Loving Kindness Meditation self-compassion Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: These results highlight the role played by cognitive conflicts and emotional eating as differentiating elements between OB and OB-BED, with a high level of predictive accuracy.ResumenAntecedentes/Objetivos: El trastorno por Atracón (TA) es un trastorno de la conducta alimentaria asociado frecuentemente con la obesidad. Con el objetivo de identificar las variables que permiten detectar mejor la presencia de TA se compararon personas con malnutrición por exceso con y sin TA respecto a la presencia de conflictos cognitivos, sintomatología alimentaria y sintomatología ansioso-depresiva. ...
Source: International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
ConclusionDuring the PASAT-C, individuals with eating disorders (EDs) compared to HCs report higher levels of negative emotions, despite similar physiological and behavioral manifestations of distress.
Source: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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