Preclinical study finds stevia is comparable to antibiotics in the treatment of Lyme disease

(Natural News) Research published in the European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology revealed yet another sweet benefit of stevia. Known for its natural sweetening properties, stevia was discovered to be a safer and even more effective alternative to conventional, toxic antibiotics in treating Lyme disease. The researchers from the University of New Haven used an alcohol extract...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Charlotte Mason1, Xiaoyan Liu2, Spoorthy Prabhudeva1 and Zhiming Ouyang1* 1Department of Molecular Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States 2Department of Microbiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, United States BosR, a Fur family member, is essential for the pathogenesis of the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi. Unlike typical Fur proteins in which DNA binding represses gene expression, binding of BosR to the rpoS promoter directly activates rpoS transcription in B. burgdorferi. However, virtually nothing is known concerning potential structural fea...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
This article originally appeared on Health.com
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
Publication date: 2017 Source:Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Volume 145 Author(s): Istvan Katona, Joachim Weis This chapter reviews the diseases of the peripheral nerves from a neuropathologic point of view, with a special focus on specific morphologic changes, and includes a summary of the histopathologic methods available for their diagnosis. As the rate of obesity and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes increase, diabetic neuropathy is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy. Many systemic disorders with metabolic origin, like amyloidosis, hepatic failure, vitamin deficiencies, uremia, lipid metabolism disorders,...
Source: Handbook of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
As it gets warmer and people start spending more time outside, I have more and more patients coming into my office and complaining of a “sun allergy.” A sun allergy is really a layman’s term, which refers to a number of conditions when a rash occurs on skin that has been exposed to the sun. These are also referred to as photosensitive disorders or photodermatoses, and can be broadly categorized into the following medical terms: idiopathic photodermatoses, exogenous photodermatoses, photoexacerbated dermatoses, genetic photodermatoses, and metabolic photodermatoses. Sounds complicated, right?  A...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Someone in recovery circles once told me that if you have one foot in the past and another in the future, you are essentially peeing on the present. I try to remember that when I’m engulfed in regret — obsessing about all the things I did wrong in the past and wishing to God I had made different decisions. However, writing about my mistakes has always been healing for me because I’d like to think this small action could possibly prevent someone else from making the same ones. If I can help a young person or anyone who has recently been diagnosed with depression take a more direct route to healing, it seem...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Medications Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Personal Psychiatry Stress Suicide Treatment Bipolar Disorder Depressive Episode Epigenetics Major Depressive Disorder Melancholy Neuroplasticity Sa Source Type: blogs
Discussion Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a Flavivirae, arbovirus that is endemic to many areas of Asia and the Pacific. It is estimated to affect ~70,000 people/year with ~10-15,000 deaths yearly in 20 countries, with a fatality rate of 35-40%. It can cause encephalitis and irreversible neurological morbidity. JEV is spread by Culex mosquitos which feed on swine. Increased environmental temperature and increased humidity (warm air is more moist) increases mosquito numbers, their survivability and ultimate dissemination. China has the highest rates of JEV with particular areas being more prone, as some areas co-farm ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
“Doesn’t it typically happen during the summer?” asked a worried lady that had walked into my clinic in November with a growing circular rash on her wrist. She was referring, of course, to Lyme disease, that scourge of outdoor enthusiasts. While the peak season for Lyme disease is indeed summer, the ticks that transmit it are active March through December. And, while this may be off-season for the ticks, it is a good time to catch up on how to stay safe in the not-so-distant spring. What is Lyme disease, and how do you treat it? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi which is sp...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Source Type: blogs
Discussion Fatigue is a subjective feeling of decreased energy, tiredness or feeling of exhaustion. Lethargy is often used synonymously, but lethargy is a state of being drowsiness or sleepy, and implies mental status changes. Both can cause the person to be apathetic or less active. Fatigue is a common state that almost everyone experiences multiple times in his or her lifetime. For most people it is a relatively acute or short-term chronic problem, often with a relatively easily identifiable problem cause, such as inadequate sleep, acute illness, or overexertion. For some, it can be less readily identifiable such as dep...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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