Atypical Cutaneous Presentations of Sarcoidosis: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe goal of this review is to provide the reader with an updated summary of the cutaneous manifestations of systemic sarcoidosis, with a particular emphasis on the predilection of sarcoidosis for scars, tattoos, and other areas of traumatized skin.Recent FindingsWhile the mechanism underlying the propensity for traumatized skin to develop sarcoidosis lesions remains unclear, several theories have been proposed including the idea that cutaneous sarcoidosis represents an exuberant, antigen-driven foreign-body response, as well as the theory that traumatized skin represents an immunocompromised district with altered local immune trafficking and neural signaling.SummaryIn this review, we present two cases in which the development of cutaneous lesions in scars and tattoos was integral to the diagnosis of systemic sarcoidosis. We then review the various cutaneous manifestations of systemic sarcoidosis, the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of scar and tattoo sarcoidosis, the proposed mechanism by which traumatized skin is prone to developing sarcoidosis lesions, and current treatments for cutaneous sarcoidosis.
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research

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Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research
PMID: 28259391 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
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Source: Allergo Journal International - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Author Affiliations open 1Inserm, U1168, VIMA: Aging and Chronic Diseases, Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, Villejuif, France; 2Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Human Cancer Genetics Program, Madrid, Spain; 3Inserm UMR 1181 [Biostatistics, Biomathematics, Pharmacoepidemiology and Infectious Diseases (B2PHI)], Villejuif, France; 4Institut Pasteur, UMR 1181, B2PHI, Paris, France; 5Univ Versailles St.-Quentin-en-Yvelines, UMR 1181, B2PHI, Montigny le Bretonneux, France; 6ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spai...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Articles February 2017 Source Type: research
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Source: Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Brief Communication Source Type: research
In conclusion, we have utilized a broad‐scaled affinity proteomics approach to identify three proteins with altered plasma levels in asthmatic children, representing one of the first evaluations of HPGDS and NPSR1 protein levels in plasma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Brief Communication Source Type: research
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