Diabetes sufferers more likely to get Parkinson’s

TYPE 2 diabetes sufferers are a third more likely to be struck down with Parkinson ’s than the general population, research suggests. Breakthrough studies by British scientists show a clear link between the two devastating conditions with younger Type 2 sufferers most at risk.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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According to a study, presented at the American Academy of Neurology, patients with type-2 diabetes have a 31% greater risk of developing Parkinson's disease.Mirror
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
Professor Tom Warner, from the Neurology Institute at University College London, who led the study, said it was most comprehensive evidence to date to show a link.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(MedPage Today) -- Risk of Parkinson's later in life higher among younger T2D patients
Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
WEDNESDAY, June 13, 2018 -- There is an increased rate of subsequent Parkinson's disease among individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), according to a study published online June 13 in Neurology. Eduardo De Pablo-Fernandez, M.D.,...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
WEDNESDAY, June 13, 2018 -- Men and women with type 2 diabetes may face a significantly higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease later in life, new British research suggests. The finding of a link followed the tracking of Parkinson's diagnoses...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Recent (and not yet fully accepted) evidence suggests that chimpanzees and dolphins might suffer Alzheimer's disease, or at least a condition that is similar enough to be comparable. Other than possibly those two species, humans are the only mammals to experience Alzheimer's, the aggregation of amyloid-β and tau proteins into solid deposits that alter brain biochemistry for the worse. Why is this the case? What is it about our particular evolutionary path that resulted in this outcome? Might that teach us anything that could be used to suppress the development of the condition? In this article, Alzheimer's is p...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 18 May 2018 Source:Journal of Molecular Biology Author(s): Darcy S. Davidson, Anne M. Brown, Justin A. Lemkul Pathological aggregation of amyloid-forming proteins is a hallmark of a number of human diseases, including Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's, and more. Despite having very different primary amino acid sequences, these amyloid proteins form similar supramolecular, fibril structures that are highly resilient to physical and chemical denaturation. To better understand the structural stability of disease-related amyloids and to gain a greater understanding of factors that st...
Source: Journal of Molecular Biology - Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: research
You are probably familiar with the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and olive oil. The diet has been associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer and Type 2 diabetes, as well as a reduced risk of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. But there's another diet that has its roots overseas, and it appears to offer similar health benefits.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
You are probably familiar with the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and olive oil. The diet has been associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer and Type 2 diabetes, as well as a reduced risk of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. But there's another diet that has its roots overseas, and it appears to offer similar health benefits.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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