The U.S. is failing at mental health care

Where I practice, the process of referring a patient suffering a mental illness is quite infuriating. The wait to get in to see a psychiatrist or psychologist can be months all the while patients are suffering. Worse yet, with certain insurances, there are just no mental health providers available for any of their covered patients. The failure of treating mental health disease in the U.S. is glaring. In the U.S., approximately one in 25 people suffer a mental illness in any given year that limits one or more life activities. Despite the fact that mental illness is so prevalent, service to treat these disorders is not. Many psychiatrists now operate a cash-based practice because they were losing money treating patients. And many patients just cannot afford treatment out-of-pocket. As a primary care doctor, I treat a host of various mental health issues including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and more. However, there may come a point in treatment that I am outside my comfort zone and a referral to a specialist is the most appropriate course of treatment. When this is not available, there is little that can be done for the patient. I can continue to practice outside of my area of expertise but this is not truly a good idea for the patient or myself. The patient may end up in the ER if a worsening of the disease ensues. Here again, this is not the best course of action. The patient may simply give up in this flawed system and hide their disorder. Continue reading ... You...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Primary Care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Gender transitioning has always been a topic that makes many people uncomfortable. And ever since Bruce became Kaitlin, it’s been a frequent topic of conversation. Most of the discomfort comes from unfamiliarity, from presumptions, and (of course) from bigotry. In this episode, two transgender women explain what it means to be transgender, both generally and personally. They talk about their experiences going back more than twenty years. They discuss how transitioning, and the science of it, changed over the decades. And they offer their views on what they believe are the most important things for society to know abo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Stigma The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard LGBTQ Psych Central Show Podcast Transgender Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
By Emma Young Aerobic exercise – any activity that gets your heart pumping harder – improves mood, anxiety and memory. It can help people with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and anxiety disorder. Now there’s evidence, from a randomised controlled trial published in Frontiers in Psychiatry, that a programme of regular aerobic exercise also reduces psychopathology in people diagnosed with schizophrenia. And it seems to have a particular impact on so-called “negative” symptoms, such as apathy and loss of emotional feeling, which are not improved by standard drug treatments. “[W...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental health Psychosis Source Type: blogs
AbstractFew epidemiological studies presented 12-month and lifetime prevalence estimates for DSM-IV mental disorders in the adult general population by sex and age up to very old age. From 2007 to 2010, DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed with the DIA-X/M-CIDI amongN = 2400 participants (aged 29–89 years) from the Study of Health in Pomerania, an epidemiological study based on a two-stage stratified cluster sample randomly drawn from the adult general population in northeastern Germany. 36.3% of the sample was affected by any 12-month and 54.8% by any li fetime mental disorder. The most frequent ...
Source: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
When we hear the word tantrum, we picture a 2-year-old lying on the floor kicking and screaming. Very rarely do we use it to describe an adult having an outburst. In reality, adults can have this kind of outburst at any moment in time. We don’t typically refer to an adult as having a tantrum. We refer to them as being angry or “just blowing off some steam.” However, when their behavior becomes cyclical, predictive, or problematic the impact of their behavior should be assessed and addressed. Tantrums typically follow an action made by another person that results in the recipient feeling angry, disappoint...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Agitation Anger Communication Violence and Aggression Anger Management Emotional Dysregulation Rage Tantrums Source Type: blogs
 Nearly all adults in the U.S. have experienced a traumatic event in their lives. Up to 20% of these will go on to develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This is not a condition exclusive to veterans (although they do experience it at a higher rate than the general population). There are several methods used to address PTSD in therapy. Our guest this week presents a new type of treatment, one that promises to do more than just treat the symptoms, but get to the root of the problem. The goal is not to just survive PTSD, but to thrive in spite of it. . Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General PTSD The Psych Central Show Trauma Gabe Howard Recovery Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
Bipolar disorder type II (BD-II) is characterized by frequent depressive phases, comorbidities such as anxiety and personality disorders, and high risk for disability and suicidal behaviors (Dell'Osso, Holtzman, Goffin, Portillo, Hooshmand, Miller et  al., 2015; Holma, Haukka, Suominen, Valtonen, Mantere, Melartin et al., 2014; Nordentoft and Mortensen, 2011). BD II patients are also at elevated risk for relapse and recurrence, which increase their risk for self-harm and suicide (Holma et al., 2014).
Source: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
One of the drawbacks to talking to people for a living about bipolar and schizophrenia is that the people often want to talk back. While most of the conversations are supportive and caring, some of the questions and comments Gabe and Michelle hear are less than inspiring. As anyone who leaves their house already knows, going outside means you have to endure some level of ignorance. Women and minorities have spoken for years about the stupid comments they’ve had to put up with from the public. We are not talking about blatant sexism or racism either, just little irksome comments that would otherwise go unnoticed &ndas...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Depression Happiness Self-Help Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Recent cannabis use was associated with negative long-term symptomatic and treatment outcomes across AMD. The findings should be interpreted with caution, considering the observational designs across studies and the biases associated with the samples (eg, inpatients) and sources of cannabis consumed (ie, unregulated sources). Nonetheless, clinicians can use the insight gained to inform their own and their patients' knowledge concerning potential risks of cannabis with regard to symptoms of AMD. PMID: 29877641 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: J Clin Psychiatry Source Type: research
Gamification is gaining recognition as a powerful tool for contexts far removed from gaming itself, and the approach has been used for applications as varied as advertising, to recruiting, to rewards programs. Litesprite hopes to expand the gaming ap...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Medicine Net News Pediatrics Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
Money is the root of all arguments… or might seem so, for many couples. But why is this the case? What is it about money that makes it such an issue? Kiné Corder is what you might call a “financial therapist,” a psychotherapist who specializes in financial issues her clients are struggling with. She explains the way our money beliefs are formed at a far younger age than one might think, why money is such a hot point in our relationships, our warped concept of “value,” and how to be more conscious about our relationships with and conversations about money. . Subscribe to Our Show! ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Money and Financial Relationships The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
More News: Anxiety | Bipolar | Blogging | Depression | General Medicine | Health Management | Mania | Men | Primary Care | Psychiatry | Psychology