The U.S. is failing at mental health care

Where I practice, the process of referring a patient suffering a mental illness is quite infuriating. The wait to get in to see a psychiatrist or psychologist can be months all the while patients are suffering. Worse yet, with certain insurances, there are just no mental health providers available for any of their covered patients. The failure of treating mental health disease in the U.S. is glaring. In the U.S., approximately one in 25 people suffer a mental illness in any given year that limits one or more life activities. Despite the fact that mental illness is so prevalent, service to treat these disorders is not. Many psychiatrists now operate a cash-based practice because they were losing money treating patients. And many patients just cannot afford treatment out-of-pocket. As a primary care doctor, I treat a host of various mental health issues including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and more. However, there may come a point in treatment that I am outside my comfort zone and a referral to a specialist is the most appropriate course of treatment. When this is not available, there is little that can be done for the patient. I can continue to practice outside of my area of expertise but this is not truly a good idea for the patient or myself. The patient may end up in the ER if a worsening of the disease ensues. Here again, this is not the best course of action. The patient may simply give up in this flawed system and hide their disorder. Continue reading ... You...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Primary Care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

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AbstractBackgroundThe impact of well-controlled or historical psychiatric diagnoses in patients seeking bariatric surgery (BS) on perioperative outcomes is unclear. The primary objective of this study was to determine the impact of psychiatric diagnoses on hospital length of stay (LOS), 30-day readmission rates after BS, and post-operative weight loss outcomes.MethodsPatients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRNYGB) from 2014 to 2016 at a single academic institution were retrospectively reviewed. Baseline demographic data and psychiatric history including depression, anxiety,...
Source: Surgical Endoscopy - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Karin Meissner1,2*, Nicola Talsky1, Elisabeth Olliges1,2, Carmen Jacob1,3,4, Oliver J. Stötzer5, Christoph Salat5, Michael Braun6 and Raluca Flondor1 1Institute of Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany 2Division of Health Promotion, Coburg University of Applied Sciences, Coburg, Germany 3Clinical Neurosciences, Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom 4Wessex Neurological Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom 5Haematology and Oncology, Outpatient Cancer Ca...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusion: These findings support the hypothesis that in FM a deteriorated function of cortical inhibition, indexed by a higher SICI parameter, a lower function of the DPMS, together with a higher level of BDNF indicate that FM has different pathological substrates from depression. They suggest that an up-regulation phenomenon of intracortical inhibitory networks associated with a disruption of the DPMS function occurs in FM. Introduction Major depressive disorder (MDD) and fibromyalgia (FM) present overlapped symptoms. Although the connection between these two disorders has not been elucidated yet, the disruption...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Altered Brain Function in Drug-Naïve Major Depressive Disorder Patients With Early-Life Maltreatment: A Resting-State fMRI StudyZhexue Xu1,2†, Jing Zhang1†, Di Wang3†, Ting Wang4, Shu Zhang5, Xi Ren2, Xiaolei Zhu7, Atsushi Kamiya7, Jiliang Fang6* and Miao Qu1,2*1Department of Neurology, Xuan Wu Hospital Capital Medical University, Beijing, China2Department of Neurology, Third Affiliated Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China3Department of Clinical Psychology, Beijing Anding Hospital, Beijing, China4Nanjing Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionsSocial interactions are the most complex and ambiguous environments human beings place themselves in. Many explicit and implicit “rules” govern what is considered appropriate and what can be expected from any one interaction. Consequently, they are settings rife for miscommunication and misunderstanding. It requires intricate examination to determine exactly what the rewarding components of social interactions are. Social interactions are highly dynamic, complex circumstances that seem more inclined to produce anxiety than lead to rewards given their ambiguities. For those with social anhedonia, whos...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Christina Huff At one point Christina Huff was living her dream: thriving as a paralegal in Chicago and newly in love. Five years and one divorce later, she’s still piecing together the debris – living with bipolar disorder and accepting a different kind of life. She has translated her passion for law to mental health advocacy, helping others rise from difficulty with gracefulness and determination, and is a beautiful model of turning pain into service. Living with bipolar, anxiety, eating disorders, and chronic pain, she beautifully weaves bits of her life and advice from other warriors on her site, Bipolar Ho...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Interview Mental Health and Wellness Peer Support Source Type: blogs
 Even if we live with mental illness, ourselves, we can be frustrated when we don’t know how to help a friend or family member who’s dealing with it. We may find that coping skills that work for us may not work for someone else. Medications that work for us may not work for the other person. In this episode, Gabe and Michelle discuss how to help friends with mental illness, including the help available through caregivers, medication, and more.   SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW “And I wonder to myself, ‘Why do you tolerate this s**t?’” – Gabe Howard   Highlights From &lsq...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Caregivers Depression Friends Source Type: blogs
Authors: Gyawali S, Sharma P, Mahapatra A Abstract Meningioma is a slow-growing benign tumor arising from meninges and is usually asymptomatic. Though neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in patients with brain tumors, they often can be the only manifestation in cases of meningioma. Meningiomas might present with mood symptoms, psychosis, memory disturbances, personality changes, anxiety, or anorexia nervosa. The diagnosis of meningioma could be delayed where only psychiatric symptoms are seen. A comprehensive review of the literature and individual patient data analysis was conducted, which included all case repor...
Source: Asian Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Asian J Psychiatr Source Type: research
 Most of us are familiar with post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD (deservedly) gets a lot of attention, largely focused on soldiers returning from service. But trauma comes in many forms, and most people have experienced it in one form or another. In this episode, learn about the differences between PTSD and other forms of trauma, how to identify it, and what can be done about it.   Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Robert T. Muller, Ph.D., is the author of the psychotherapy book, “Trauma &the Struggle to Open Up:  From Avoidance to Recovery &a...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General PTSD The Psych Central Show Trauma Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: Although a cause–effect relationship cannot be firmly stated, an association between early trauma experience and cognitive impairment such as visual memory, as well as a relationship between negative symptoms and attention domains, is suggested by our preliminary findings. Future studies with larger sample sizes and prospective design will clarify the long-term effects of early exposure to trauma and its clinical meaning in terms of developing psychotic-related illness.IntroductionMore than 75% of patients with schizophrenia show some level of cognitive impairment, leading to poor functional status and im...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
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