The U.S. is failing at mental health care

Where I practice, the process of referring a patient suffering a mental illness is quite infuriating. The wait to get in to see a psychiatrist or psychologist can be months all the while patients are suffering. Worse yet, with certain insurances, there are just no mental health providers available for any of their covered patients. The failure of treating mental health disease in the U.S. is glaring. In the U.S., approximately one in 25 people suffer a mental illness in any given year that limits one or more life activities. Despite the fact that mental illness is so prevalent, service to treat these disorders is not. Many psychiatrists now operate a cash-based practice because they were losing money treating patients. And many patients just cannot afford treatment out-of-pocket. As a primary care doctor, I treat a host of various mental health issues including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and more. However, there may come a point in treatment that I am outside my comfort zone and a referral to a specialist is the most appropriate course of treatment. When this is not available, there is little that can be done for the patient. I can continue to practice outside of my area of expertise but this is not truly a good idea for the patient or myself. The patient may end up in the ER if a worsening of the disease ensues. Here again, this is not the best course of action. The patient may simply give up in this flawed system and hide their disorder. Continue reading ... You...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Primary Care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Brain and Behavior Mental Health and Wellness Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
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Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Bipolar Disorders General Personal Stories Self-Help Stigma Treatment being healthy with bipolar Bipolar 2 Bipolar II disorder Depression Hypomania Hypomanic Episode Major Depressive Episode managing bipolar II disorder Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Binge Eating Eating Disorders General The Psych Central Show Emotional Overeating Gabe Howard Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Grief and Loss Schizophrenia Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Children and Teens OCD Parenting Personal Student Therapist Students Success & Achievement Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Suicide The Psych Central Show Gabe Howard Suicide Awareness Suicide Prevention Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
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Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Technology app Brain-Training brain-training-app cognitive-flexibility handwashing obsessive-compulsive disorder OCD smartphone Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bullying General Professional The Psych Central Show Coworkers Gabe Howard Psych Central Show Podcast Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Depression Schizophrenia Suicide Source Type: blogs
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antidepressant Bipolar Medications Personal Psychotherapy Bipolar Disorder Depressive Episode Hypomania Manic Episode medication change Psychopharmacology Source Type: blogs
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