Elevated Blood Pressure Could Increase Your Risk Of Dementia

BOSTON (CBS) – Even if your blood pressure is just a little bit elevated, you may be at higher risk of dementia later in life. In a new study, researchers looked at about 10,000 people and found that 50 year olds with systolic blood pressures of 130 or greater had a 45-percent higher risk of dementia later in life, even if they didn’t have evidence of heart or blood vessel-related problems. The medical community used to consider 140/90 as the threshold for high blood pressure, but that threshold was recently lowered to 130/80. However, many patients still aren’t treated until their numbers climb higher than that. This is more evidence that 130/80 is the number to keep in mind when it comes to diagnosing and treating high blood pressure.
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local blood pressure Dementia Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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