NEK1 loss-of-function mutation induces DNA damage accumulation in ALS patient-derived motoneurons

Publication date: Available online 12 June 2018 Source:Stem Cell Research Author(s): Julia Higelin, Alberto Catanese, Lena Luisa Semelink-Sedlacek, Sertap Oeztuerk, Anne-Kathrin Lutz, Julia Bausinger, Gotthold Barbi, Günter Speit, Peter M. Andersen, Albert C. Ludolph, Maria Demestre, Tobias M. Boeckers Mutations in genes coding for proteins involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and repair, such as C9orf72 and FUS (Fused in Sarcoma), are associated with neurodegenerative diseases and lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in NEK1 (NIMA-related kinase 1) have also been recently found to cause ALS. NEK1 codes for a multifunctional protein, crucially involved in mitotic checkpoint control and DDR. To resolve pathological alterations associated with NEK1 mutation, we compared hiPSC-derived motoneurons carrying a NEK1 mutation with mutant C9orf72 and wild type neurons at basal level and after DNA damage induction. Motoneurons carrying a C9orf72 mutation exhibited cell specific signs of increased DNA damage. This phenotype was even more severe in NEK1c.2434A>T neurons that showed significantly increased DNA damage at basal level and impaired DDR after induction of DNA damage in an maturation-dependent manner. Our results provide first mechanistic insight in pathophysiological alterations induced by NEK1 mutations and point to a converging pathomechanism of different gene mutations causative for ALS. Therefore, our study contribu...
Source: Stem Cell Research - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research

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Publication date: 24 July 2018Source: Cell Reports, Volume 24, Issue 4Author(s): Eva-Maria Hock, Zuzanna Maniecka, Marian Hruska-Plochan, Stefan Reber, Florent Laferrière, Sonu Sahadevan M.K., Helena Ederle, Lauren Gittings, Lucas Pelkmans, Luc Dupuis, Tammaryn Lashley, Marc-David Ruepp, Dorothee Dormann, Magdalini PolymenidouSummaryThe primarily nuclear RNA-binding protein FUS (fused in sarcoma) forms pathological cytoplasmic inclusions in a subset of early-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients. In response to cellular stress, FUS is recruited to cytoplasmic stress gra...
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Stem Cell Research, Volume 30Author(s): Julia Higelin, Alberto Catanese, Lena Luisa Semelink-Sedlacek, Sertap Oeztuerk, Anne-Kathrin Lutz, Julia Bausinger, Gotthold Barbi, Günter Speit, Peter M. Andersen, Albert C. Ludolph, Maria Demestre, Tobias M. BoeckersAbstractMutations in genes coding for proteins involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and repair, such as C9orf72 and FUS (Fused in Sarcoma), are associated with neurodegenerative diseases and lead to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in NEK1 (NIMA-related kinase 1) have also been recently...
Source: Stem Cell Research - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
Authors: Azuma Y, Mizuta I, Tokuda T, Mizuno T Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects upper and lower motor neurons in the brain and the spinal cord. Due to the progressive neurodegeneration, ALS leads to paralysis and death caused by respiratory failure 2-5 years after the onset of symptoms. There is no effective cure available. Most ALS cases are sporadic, without family history, whereas 10% of the cases are familial. Identification of variants in more than 30 different loci has provided insight into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms mediating disease...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Publication date: 2018 Source:Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Volume 153 Author(s): Jacob I. Ayers, Neil R. Cashman The prion hypothesis – a protein conformation capable of replicating without a nucleic acid genome – was heretical at the time of its discovery. However, the characteristics of the disease-misfolded prion protein and its ability to transmit disease, replicate, and spread are now widely accepted throughout the scientific community. In fact, in the last decade a wealth of evidence has emerged supporting similar properties observed for many of the misfolded proteins implicated in other neurodegenera...
Source: Handbook of Clinical Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract TAR DNA-binding protein-43 KDa (TDP-43) and fused in sarcoma (FUS) as the defining pathological hallmarks for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), coupled with ALS-FTD-causing mutations in both genes, indicate that their dysfunctions damage the motor system and cognition. On the molecular level, TDP-43 and FUS participate in the biogenesis and metabolism of coding and noncoding RNAs as well as in the transport and translation of mRNAs as part of cytoplasmic mRNA-ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granules. Intriguingly, many of the RNA targets of TDP-43 and FUS are involved ...
Source: Neural Plasticity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neural Plast Source Type: research
Authors: Hikiami R, Yamakado H, Tatsumi S, Ayaki T, Hashi Y, Yamashita H, Sawamoto N, Tsuji T, Urushitani M, Takahashi R Abstract We herein report a 15-year-old girl who developed rapid progressive muscle weakness soon after the third injection of a bivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. Although immunotherapies were performed for possible vaccine-related disorders, she died of respiratory failure 14 months after the onset of the disease. A genetic analysis identified a heterozygous p.P525L mutation of the fused in sarcoma (FUS) gene, and a histopathological analysis was also consistent with FUS-associated a...
Source: Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Intern Med Source Type: research
AbstractMutations in fused in sarcoma (FUS) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS is a multifunctional protein involved in the biogenesis and activity of several types of RNAs, and its role in the pathogenesis of ALS may involve both direct effects of disease-associated mutations through gain- and loss-of-function mechanisms and indirect effects due to the cross talk between different classes of FUS-dependent RNAs. To explore how FUS mutations impinge on motor neuron-specific RNA-based circuitries, we performed transcriptome profiling of small and long RNAs of motor neurons (MNs) derived from mouse embryonic stem ...
Source: Molecular Neurobiology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Contributors : Alessia Loffreda ; Alessandro Arosio ; Marc-David Ruepp ; Raffaele A Calogero ; Stefano Volinia ; Caterina Bendotti ; Carlo Ferrarese ; Christian Lunetta ; Oliver M ühlemann ; Lucio Tremolizzo ; Silvia M BarabinoSeries Type : Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencingOrganism : Homo sapiensAmyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) involves the degeneration of brain and spinal cord motor neurons. Mutations in Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and Fused-in-Sarcoma (FUS) account for 20-30 % of the familial ALS (fALS) cases. The RNA-binding proteins TDP-43 and FUS func...
Source: GEO: Gene Expression Omnibus - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Tags: Non-coding RNA profiling by high throughput sequencing Homo sapiens Source Type: research
Mutations in fused in sarcoma (FUS) are linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting both upper and lower motor neurons. While it is established that astrocytes contribute to the death of motor neurons in ALS, the specific contribution of mutant FUS (mutFUS) through astrocytes has not yet been studied. Here, we used primary astrocytes expressing a N‐terminally GFP tagged R521G mutant or wild‐type FUS (WTFUS) and show that mutFUS‐expressing astrocytes undergo astrogliosis, damage co‐cultured motor neurons via activation of an inflammatory response and produce conditioned...
Source: Glia - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
Abnormal intracellular accumulation of the fused in sarcoma (FUS) protein is the characteristic pathological feature of cases of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by FUS mutations (ALS-FUS) and several uncommon disorders that may present with sporadic frontotemporal dementia (FTLD-FUS). Although these findings provide further support for the concept that ALS and FTD are closely related clinical syndromes with an overlapping molecular basis, important differences in the pathological features and results from experimental models indicate that ALS-FUS and FTLD-FUS have distinct pathogenic mechanisms.
Source: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Prion Diseases PERSPECTIVES Source Type: research
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