How can patients be protected from post-surgery opioid addiction?

(Springer) Greater coordination is needed between surgeons and physicians about the prescription of pain-relieving opioid drugs following surgery to help identify patients who are at risk of becoming opioid addicts. This is according to Michael Klueh of the University of Michigan in the US who led a retrospective review of medical specialty areas to find out which are most likely to prescribe opioids for the first time to postoperative patients.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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Much of what we think we know about cannabis may soon change as a result of new research that uncovers some surprising facts. Indeed, the topic, which can be emotionally charged, is the focus of intense scientific study. Is cannabis good for you? Is it addictive? What long-term harms can use cause? The answers to these questions are multi-layered and not always clear-cut, which is why cannabis research continues with even more urgency. FACTS ON CANNABIS ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCE Current estimates are that one in 10 cannabis users will develop cannabis addiction or dependence. The potency of the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Habits Healthy Living Memory and Perception Miscellaneous Drugs Neuroscience Substance Abuse Source Type: news
There are plenty of reasons to never allow a bagel, sandwich, or pretzels to cross your lips again. But here are the top 10 most powerful and compelling reasons to tell the USDA and other providers of dietary advice to bug off with their “healthy whole grains” nonsense. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides (from partial digestion to 4- and 5-amino acid long fragments) increase appetite substantially–as do related proteins from rye, barley, and corn. This is a big part of the reason why grains make you gain weight. Gliadin-derived opioid peptides are mind active drugs that trigger behavioral outbursts in kids ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates autoimmune blood sugar Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation joint pain low-carb wheat belly Source Type: blogs
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 -- Surgery patients typically use only one-quarter of the opioids they're prescribed for post-operative pain, a new study finds. And those leftover pills pose a risk of misuse, addiction and overdose, researchers at the...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
You're reading We All Have Scars: Let Go of your Childhood’s pain, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Between the moment we are born, to the moment we reach adulthood, many of us experience incredible, profound pain. Some of us have been sexually, physically, or psychologically abused — and then left to pick up the pieces on our own. In the most vulnerable and sensitive stage of our lives, we’ve been exposed to the deep flaws of those around us. And with that, our deep innocence and...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: blogging featured happiness philosophy psychology relationships self confidence mindset psychology childhood trauma Source Type: blogs
On November 2 the Food and Drug Administration  announced the approval of Dsuvia, a sublingual tablet containing the powerful fentanyl analog, sufentanil. Sufentanil has been used for years in the hospital setting, primarily in intravenous form for anesthesia. It is  roughly 5 to 10 times more potent than fentanyl, and thus has a significant overdose potential. The FDA reached this decision following a 10-3 vote in favor of the drug’s approval by the Anesthetic and Analgesia Drug Products Advisory Committee (AADPAC),based on data from multicenter trials.  It was not approved for outpatie...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Ethimedix, a Swiss medical device company, has developed the SmartBottle, a drug administration device for analgesics. The device is a programmable “lockbox” which allows for the controlled administration of single doses of opioid painkil...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Geriatrics Medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Despite the ongoing opioid crisis plaguing the nation, the US Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a new opioid medication five to 10 times more powerful than fentanyl. Dsuvia, made by AcelRx Pharmaceuticals Inc., is a tablet in a single-dose, prefilled applicator to be administered under the tongue by health care providers to patients in settings such as hospitals, surgical centers and emergency rooms, according to the company. FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb was quick to defended the approval in a statement Friday: “The agency is taking new steps to more actively confront this crisis, ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Local TV opioids Source Type: news
Funding Opportunity RFA-NS-19-010 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to support preclinical optimization and development of safe, effective, and non-addictive small molecule and biologic therapeutics to treat pain. The goal of the program is to accelerate the optimization and development of promising small molecule and biologic hits/leads towards clinical trials. Applicants must have a promising hit/lead, robust biological rationale for the intended approach, and identified assays for optimization of the agent. The scope of this program includes optim...
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
INADEQUATE PAIN control after cardiac surgery in patients with midline sternotomy can result in increased morbidity and hospital stay.1 Many factors contribute to this pain, including physician reluctance to give large doses of opioids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because of the risk of addiction, kidney injury, or bleeding. In addition, opioid side effects such as respiratory depression, nausea and vomiting, decreased gastrointestinal motility, and potential peripheral vasodilation may worsen the patient's condition and produce unfavorable outcomes.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this review offer clinical insight and reinforce the importance of psychosocial interventions in CNCP and opioid use disorders. However, little empirical data are available to guide practitioners in treating patients with CNCP who misuse opioid medications, and thus future research on integrated approaches, is needed. PMID: 30387858 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Opioid Management - Category: Addiction Tags: J Opioid Manag Source Type: research
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