Australian guideline developers join forces to advance Living Evidence

This news item was orginally posted on Cochrane Australia website.A new report published heralds an exciting development for evidence-based health care in Australia, with the promise of near real-time incorporation of research into evidence-based guideline recommendations now a step closer to reality. TheLiving Evidence for Australian Health Care report details the outcomes of forum hosted byCochrane Australia last month  which brought together leading experts in evidence synthesis and guideline development across several of Australia’s most pressing chronic diseases to explore opportunities for advancing ‘Living’ models of systematic review and guideline production.Over the last five years, Cochrane and a number of Australian and international  partners have developed the foundations of the Living Evidence model of evidence synthesis and dissemination. This world-leading approach harnesses innovations in data systems, machine learning and citizen science to enable near real-time updating of systematic reviews, evidence-based guideline recommendations and other evidence products. Importantly, the Living Evidence model fast-tracks evidence synthesis without  compromising the rigorous, gold standard methods for systematic review that are needed to provide trustworthy recommendations about what works best in health based on the all of the evidence generated to date.In what...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news

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ConclusionAlcohol abuse as a pre ‐stroke risk factor, poststroke urinary incontinence as a neurological symptom, and dependence in grooming as a factor of disability were associated with earlier mortality in the first seven years after stroke.
Source: Brain and Behavior - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
This study's researchers approached all people turning 85 in 2006 in two cities in the UK for participation. At the beginning of the study in 2006-2007, there were 722 participants, 60 percent of whom were women. The participants provided researchers with information about what they ate every day, their body weight and height measurements, their overall health assessment (including any level of disability), and their medical records. The researchers learned that more than one-quarter (28 percent) of very old adults had protein intakes below the recommended dietary allowance. The researchers noted that older adults w...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 10 November 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Thomas A Zelniker, Stephen D Wiviott, Itamar Raz, Kyungah Im, Erica L Goodrich, Marc P Bonaca, Ofri Mosenzon, Eri T Kato, Avivit Cahn, Remo H M Furtado, Deepak L Bhatt, Lawrence A Leiter, Darren K McGuire, John P H Wilding, Marc S SabatineSummaryBackgroundThe magnitude of effect of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) on specific cardiovascular and renal outcomes and whether heterogeneity is based on key baseline characteristics remains undefined.MethodsWe did a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised, placebo-controlled...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Omega-3 fatty acids, abundant in fish oil, are known to be good for the heart. Studies have shown that people who eat more fish rich in these fats have lower rates of heart problems and less risk of dying from heart disease compared to those who eat less. Those data have fueled a booming business in over-the-counter fish oil supplements. In a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, and presented at the American Heart Association annual meeting, researchers report that a highly purified version of omega-3 fats, called icosapent ethyl, can lower the risk of a number of heart-related events, including hear...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Heart Disease omega-3 Source Type: news
There’s good evidence that fish oil supplements may lower the risk of second heart events — like a heart attack or stroke — in people with heart disease, but few rigorous studies have investigated whether the supplement can help people to lower their risk of having a heart event in the first place. And while some data suggests that people with lower levels of vitamin D tend to have higher rates of heart disease and cancer, the evidence isn’t solid. Now, a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association offers more findi...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs Source Type: news
Circulating inflammatory cells influence endothelial function, which is important for vascular homeostasis and diseases [1]. Endothelial dysfunction is induced by several cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia) and environmental factors (e.g. hypoxia, infection, smoking, and air pollution) [2]. Recently, we have demonstrated that endothelial AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important role in the regulation of microvascular tone and blood pressure in mice [3].
Source: International Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Aspirin is best known as an over-the-counter painkiller. But acetylsalicylic acid, as it’s called chemically, has many other health benefits, as well as side effects, in the body that have only become clear in recent years. Here’s what the latest science says about the health benefits and side effects of aspirin, as well as which conditions it may treat and those it doesn’t appear to improve. (If you are taking aspirin for any reason other than for periodic pain relief, it’s best to consult with your doctor to confirm whether the benefits outweigh the risks in your particular case.) How aspirin affe...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime Source Type: news
This study aimed to evaluate if higher serum CysC levels increase the risk for vascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with normal renal function or mild renal impairment. METHODS: A total of 806 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were admitted to the diabetes center of Soonchunhyang University Hospital for blood glucose control were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with nephropathy were excluded. Subjects were categorized into quartiles of serum CysC levels (Q1, ≤0.65 mg/L; Q2, 0.66 to 0.79 mg/L; Q3, 0.80 to 0.94 mg/L; and Q4, ≥0.95 mg/L). RESULTS: The proportion of ...
Source: Diabetes and Metabolism Journal - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes Metab J Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Poland is a country of high cardiovascular risk. Because the depression was found to be a predictor of coronary artery disease and the prevalence of depressive symptoms raised worldwide, so the monitoring of depressive symptoms in a population is desirable. AIM: to evaluate the prevalence of depressive symptoms (DS) in relation to the socio-demographic status, and selected types of cardiovascular diseases in the adult Polish population. METHODS: A country representative random sample of 2413 subjects, aged 18-79, was examined in 2011. Rates of self-reported cardiovascular conditions ...
Source: Polish Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Kardiol Pol Source Type: research
AbstractAim and objectivesTo examine trends since a previous 2006 –2008 survey in diabetes knowledge held by primary health care nurses and their use of national diabetes guidelines, perceived ability to advise diabetes patients and preferences for further diabetes education.BackgroundThe obesity epidemic has led to a rapid increase in the prevalence of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to greater expectations for an expanded role for primary health care nurses in the prevention and community management of diabetes.DesignCross ‐sectional survey using a self‐administered questionnaire and telephone interview and...
Source: Journal of Clinical Nursing - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
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