Nintedanib ‘ Superior ’ to Bevacizumab for Mesothelioma Treatment

Researchers in Austria, Germany and Hungary have added to the growing belief that the anti-cancer drug nintedanib may soon become a significant part of standard-of-care treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma. In their study published recently in Clinical Cancer Research, nintedanib demonstrated an ability to inhibit the growth and the migration of mesothelioma tumor cells effectively in animal models. “This is a step in the right direction, another part of the evolutionary process of treatment advancements with this difficult disease,” Dr. Balazs Hegedus, department of thoracic surgery, University of Duisburg-Essen, told Asbestos.com. “This is an important finding.” Nintedanib, also known by brand names Ofev and Vargetef, works by targeting a specific molecule expressed by most mesothelioma tumor cells. It functions much like bevacizumab (Avastin), one of the world’s best-selling cancer drugs, but it does so more effectively, according to this latest study. “Importantly, this anti-tumor effect of nintedanib in experimental animals was stronger than that of bevacizumab,” Dr. Balazs Dome, head of the Translational Thoracic Oncology Program at the Medical University of Vienna in Austria said. “A key message is that nintedanib be considered superior as part of systemic anti-tumor therapy.” Nintedanib Smothers Tumor Cells Nintedanib inhibits tumor growth by denying cancer cells the oxygen and nutrients they need. The dru...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news

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Conclusions This study demonstrated that adding bevacizumab to standard chemotherapy in patients with advanced MPM had no negative impact on HRQoL. A significant improvement in the peripheral neuropathy and pain HRQoL dimensions was even observed. PMID: 31175096 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Clin Cancer Res Source Type: research
This study quantifies the disturbing trend that, despite the expansion in the number of patients eligible for expensive and potentially toxic ICIs [immune checkpoint inhibitors], the ratio of those benefiting is decreasing,” wrote Dr. Daniel V.T. Catenacci, co-author of an editorial that accompanied the study in JAMA Network. “Observations in this article are sobering and remind us to keep expectations realistic.” Both Catenacci and Haslem agreed that the study should serve as a reminder to patients, physicians and policy makers to have more realistic discussions about the use of, and expectations of, the...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
The U.S. Food &Drug Administration on Thursday approved Tumor Treating Fields, a therapy involving electric currents that disrupt cancer cell division and inhibit tumor growth, for the first-line treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. It is the first treatment in more than 15 years that the FDA approves for mesothelioma. In 2004, the agency added the chemotherapy drug pemetrexed (Alimta) to standard-of-care treatment. The FDA approved Novocure’s NovoTTF-100L System under the agency’s Humanitarian Device Exemption. The approval comes eight months after Novocure, which manufactures and markets the devi...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville, Tennessee, and MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have opened a much-anticipated clinical trial involving a novel T-cell therapy for patients with mesothelioma. The two institutions are establishing dosage levels and measuring efficacy of TC-210, a type of immunotherapy that targets mesothelin, a cell surface protein highly expressed in several cancers. The study also is open to patients with certain types of bile duct, ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer. Participation is based upon individual levels of mesothelin expression. Researchers at the two centers are hoping to ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Conditions:   Advanced and/or Metastatic Solid Tumors;   Stage IIIB Not Amenable to Curative Therapy to Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer;   Advanced/Metastatic Unresectable Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Interventions:   Drug: INCMGA00012;   Drug: Gemcitabine;   Drug: Cisplatin;   Drug: Pemetrexed;   Drug: Carboplatin;   Drug: Paclitaxel Sponsor:   Incyte Corporation Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Joe Abdo1, Christopher S. Wichman2, Nicholas E. Dietz1,3, Pawel Ciborowski4, John Fleegel1, Sumeet K. Mittal1,5 and Devendra K. Agrawal1* 1Department of Clinical and Translational Science, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, United States 2Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States 3Department of Pathology, CHI Health Creighton University Medical Center, College of Medicine, Omaha, NE, United States 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States 5Norton Thoracic Institute, St....
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center believes novel CAR T-cell therapy will be part of future, standard-of-care treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma. The therapy involves the laboratory reprograming of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — to attack the cancer by targeting mesothelin, a surface protein. CAR T-cell therapy is a form of immunotherapy that could extend mesothelioma survival significantly. “That’s my goal. That’s what we’ve been working toward for many years,” Adusumilli told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com....
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Researchers at Osaka University in Japan have identified a key component of physical health associated with response to immunotherapy drugs. Among people with non-small cell lung cancer, higher levels of muscle mass predicted a better response to PD-1 inhibitor immunotherapy. Sarcopenia — the term used to describe low muscle mass levels — appears to reduce the benefits a person receives from immunotherapy cancer treatment. “Sarcopenia at baseline is a significant predictor of worse outcome in patients with advanced NSCLC [non-small cell lung cancer] receiving PD-1 blockade,” the study investigators ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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