Sub-efficacious doses of phosphodiesterase 4 and 5 inhibitors improve memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

Sub-efficacious doses of phosphodiesterase 4 and 5 inhibitors improve memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Neuropharmacology. 2018 Jun 06;: Authors: Gulisano W, Tropea MR, Arancio O, Palmeri A, Puzzo D Abstract Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP cooperate to ensure memory acquisition and consolidation. Increasing their levels by phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE-Is) enhanced cognitive functions and rescued memory loss in different models of aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, side effects due to the high doses used limited their application in humans. Based on previous studies suggesting that combinations of sub-efficacious doses of cAMP- and cGMP-specific PDE-Is improved synaptic plasticity and memory in physiological conditions, here we aimed to study whether this treatment was effective to counteract the AD phenotype in APPswe mice. We found that a 3-week chronic treatment with a combination of sub-efficacious doses of the cAMP-specific PDE4-I roflumilast (0.01 mg/kg) and the cGMP-specific PDE5-I vardenafil (0.1 mg/kg) improved recognition, spatial and contextual fear memory. Importantly, the cognitive enhancement persisted for 2 months beyond administration. This long-lasting action, and the possibility to minimize side effects due to the low doses used, might open feasible therapeutic strategies against AD. PMID: 29885420 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Neuropharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Neuropharmacology Source Type: research

Related Links:

AbstractAlzheimer ’s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder which can contribute to memory loss and cognitive damage in the elderly; moreover, evidence from clinical and animal studies demonstrated that AD always exhibit severe cognitive deficits. However, the effects of donepezil medications on cogni tion are controversial. Additionally, it is unclear whether donepezil can protect neurons to improve cognitive function through the brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF)/tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) signalling pathway in the tree shrew (TS), which has a closer evolutionary relationship to pri mates ...
Source: Metabolic Brain Disease - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Researchers have found a significant link between three degenerative eye diseases and Alzheimer's disease, offering a way to detect the memory loss condition.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
About 50 percent of people who reach the age of 85 will develop Alzheimer's disease.ByAlzheimer's Reading RoomMost Alzheimer's patientswill die about eight years after exhibiting the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.Severememory loss and a precipitous decline in cognitive function are the hallmarks of the disease.But the molecular processes that lead to the disease will have begun many years earlier.What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading RoomEmail:Alzheimer's drug may stop disease if used before symptoms develop, study suggestsCurrently, there are no known ways to ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers cure alzheimers drug alzheimers research brain care of dementia patients FDA health memantine memory loss preventing alzheimers science Source Type: blogs
The study found that 91.7% of caregivers suffer from poor sleep and that this can lead to depression, heart disease, and premature death.By Alzheimer's Reading RoomThe study suggests that sleep quality for family caregivers of individuals with dementia varies considerably from night to night.Understanding the complex interrelationships among caregivers ’ sleep and other contributing variablesis an important first step toward the development of individualized and effective treatment strategies.What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaThe GistThe study aimed to identify factors related to family ca...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's Alzheimer's family alzheimers care Alzheimers Dementia care of dementia patients caregiving statistics Family Caregivers help alzheimer's help with dementia care sleep Source Type: blogs
I came to accept Alzheimer's disease for what it is--an illness that will not go away.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomI slowly learned how to take control of each situation - one at a time.The technique -- labeling your feelings and thendiffusing stress by taking a few deep breaths really helps.Breath in your nose and out your mouth slowing. Deep breaths. You will feel the stress coming out of your neck.Learn About the Difference Between Alzheimer's and DementiaLearning how to reduce stress quickly is an important, integral, part of effective Alzheimer's caregiving. Reducing stress quickly allows you to communicate m...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer caregiver stress Alzheimer's How to Reduce Stress alzheimer's symptoms care of dementia patients health help alzheimer's memory loss stress alzheimer stress dementia Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: Revista Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular (English Edition)Author(s): V. Camacho, A. Gómez-Grande, P. Sopena, D. García-Solís, M. Gómez Río, C. Lorenzo, S. Rubí, J. Arbizu, by the Grupo de Neuroimagen SEMNIMAbstractAlzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive cognitive decline and memory loss, and is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid plaques with neurofibrillary tangles are a neuropathological hallmark of AD that produces synaptic dysfunction and culminates...
Source: Revista Espanola de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular - Category: Nuclear Medicine Source Type: research
Rather than a drug or treatment, MEND is a protocol where patients made dramatic lifestyle changes. According to the ABC report, "They avoided simple carbs, gluten, and processed foods. They increased their fish intake, took yoga and meditated. They were instructed to take melatonin, get adequate sleep, incorporate vitamin B-12, vitamin D-3 and fish oil." Read the full article on HealthCentral about how lifestyle changes can help many people (not all) avoid or stave off dementia symptoms:  Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
More News: Alzheimer's | Amnesia | Brain | Drugs & Pharmacology | Levitra | Neurology | Study