Mass. Researchers May Be On Brink Of Creating Revolutionary, Non-Addictive Painkiller

CAMBRIDGE (CBS NEWS) — Researchers in Massachusetts believe they may be on the brink of creating a revolutionary non-addictive painkiller. Developed by Blue Therapeutics, Blue-181 could be a big step forward in dealing with the growing opioid crisis. The team there said it wanted to make a drug that is a total replacement for the opioids currently on the market – something that people could safely stop using without the possible dangerous side effects. Mark Loccisano felt a gratification from painkillers with his very first pill. They were prescribed by a doctor for a sports injury. It was the beginning of an opioid addiction that consumed his 20s and nearly cost him his life, reports CBS News’ Kenneth Craig. “Not many people know they’re addicts until they start using,” Loccisano said. “I ended up wrapping my work truck around a telephone pole one night, on my way home from work….And that wasn’t even enough for me to stay clean.” Loccisano is now in treatment at St. Christopher’s Inn, which is run by a ministry of the Franciscan Friars of the Atonement in Garrison, New York. He’s part of a staggering number of Americans swept up in the nation’s opioid epidemic. But now, three Harvard-trained scientists believe they’ve developed a breakthrough: a non-narcotic, non-addictive painkiller 50 times more powerful than morphine. “We were told the same thing about the painkillers currently on t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Cambridge Local TV opioid crisis Source Type: news

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Publication date: March 2019Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 73, Issue 3Author(s): Ting-An Tung, Tou-Yuan Tsai
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2019Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 73, Issue 3Author(s): Chih-Jen Yang, Chang-Chih Shih, Ching-Hsiang Lin
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2019Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 73, Issue 3Author(s): M. Bryan Dalla Betta, Dasia Esener, J. Matthew Fields
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2019Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 73, Issue 3Author(s): Heidi M. Goddard, Casey Z. MacVane, Tania D. Strout
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2019Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 73, Issue 3Author(s): Po-Chen Chou, Shih-Chieh Chien
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionImplementation of a HEART pathway in the ED evaluation of patients with chest pain resulted in less inpatient care and noninvasive cardiac testing and was safe. Using HEART to risk stratify chest pain patients can improve the efficiency and quality of care.
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionAcute pain resolution after an ED visit seems to progress through 6 different trajectory patterns that are more informative than simple linear models and could be useful to adapt acute pain management in future research.
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionA small proportion of ED patients discharged with nonspecific diagnoses of headache or back pain returned with a serious neurologic condition or inhospital death within 30 days.
Source: Annals of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research
ConclusionOur results showed that anxiety is highly related to TMD and we concluded that 62.8% of female dental students has anxiety of different levels.
Source: The Saudi Dental Journal - Category: Dentistry Source Type: research
ConclusionEndogenous opioid peptides are present in periapical lesions. The higher level of endogenous opioid peptides in asymptomatic periapical lesions could explain the lack of symptomatology in asymptomatic lesions.
Source: The Saudi Dental Journal - Category: Dentistry Source Type: research
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