Music and heart health

What’s your “cheer up” song? That question popped up on a recent text thread among a few of my longtime friends. It spurred a list of songs from the ‘70s and ‘80s, back when we were in high school and college. But did you know that music may actually help boost your health as well as your mood? Music engages not only your auditory system but many other parts of your brain as well, including areas responsible for movement, language, attention, memory, and emotion. “There is no other stimulus on earth that simultaneously engages our brains as widely as music does,” says Brian Harris, certified neurologic music therapist at Harvard-affiliated Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. This global activation happens whether you listen to music, play an instrument, or sing — even informally in the car or the shower, he says. Make my heart sing Music can also alter your brain chemistry, and these changes may produce cardiovascular benefits, as evidenced by a number of different studies. For example, studies have found that listening to music may enable people to exercise longer during cardiac stress testing done on a treadmill or stationary bike improve blood vessel function by relaxing arteries help heart rate and blood pressure levels to return to baseline more quickly after physical exertion ease anxiety in heart attack survivors help people recovering from heart surgery to feel less pain and anxiety. Notable effects Like other pleasurab...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs

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This study had a large sample size and obtained positive findings in both patients’ subjective ratings and in inflammatory marker levels. It demonstrates the benefits of adding Tai Chi to an antidepressant regimen but does not examine the specific effect of Tai Chi on depression.Field et al. (16) investigated the effects of combined Tai Chi/yoga in 92 prenatally depressed pregnant women. They found that women practicing Tai Chi/yoga (20 min per week for 12 weeks) had lower depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance scores compared to a waitlist control group (Table 1). This study had a large sample size and provided ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Humanity has come a long way from treating patients who have fallen off cliffs after having tried to fly, dressed like birds: parallel to the development of flying, the practice of how to keep people alive during flights has also greatly evolved. How can digital health add to the practice of aviation medicine in the future and make sure that passengers step off the plane as healthy as they got in? From Icarus through hot air balloons to mid-air meditation The human desire to conquer the sky is a thousand-year-old story, with tales such as the Greek myth about Daedalus and Icarus. The duo wanted to escape from Crete,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers aero aeronautics aviation emergency emergency medicine flight flight medicine Healthcare portable portable diagnostics predictive prevention technology wearables Source Type: blogs
Much of what we think we know about cannabis may soon change as a result of new research that uncovers some surprising facts. Indeed, the topic, which can be emotionally charged, is the focus of intense scientific study. Is cannabis good for you? Is it addictive? What long-term harms can use cause? The answers to these questions are multi-layered and not always clear-cut, which is why cannabis research continues with even more urgency. FACTS ON CANNABIS ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCE Current estimates are that one in 10 cannabis users will develop cannabis addiction or dependence. The potency of the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Habits Healthy Living Memory and Perception Miscellaneous Drugs Neuroscience Substance Abuse Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The actual words the doctor used were "100% blockage of natural vessels". What are "natural vessels"? They are the veins in your heart that you are born with. That is what his angiogram showed. The 3 bypass veins have some blockage. They are too fragile to put a stint in. In order to clean out the plaque, they would have to go in with a DRILL and literally drill out the plaque. Instead they are going to use drug therapy to try and increase the blood flow in his heart.Which is at 30%. So during the angiogram they were not able to stint anything.He probably had anot...
Source: Wife of a Diabetic - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: blogs
If you’re confused by the terms used to describe heart attacks, you’re not alone. They’re often described as “mild” or “massive,” or even the ominous-sounding “widow maker.” But these terms are not necessarily helpful, and they may create confusion and anxiety. The good news: most people who have a heart attack survive. The bad news? “Any heart attack can be fatal, no matter how big, how small, or where it occurs in the heart,” says Dr. James Januzzi, a cardiologist at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital. “Furthermore, there’s a lot...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: First Aid Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs
Several myths surrounding heart diseases state that heart diseases attract only elder people and more men than women are prone to heart attacks. Contrary to the belief, cardiovascular cases are on rise in women than men and it is deadlier than all forms of cancers combined. Both physiological and psychological factors are causing heart diseases and it affects people of all ages with no bias. Women that have suffered from mental illness are more susceptible to attract heart risks like stroke. Mental ill health like schizophrenia, anxiety disorders and bipolar disorders are mostly treated with antidepressants, antipsychotics...
Source: Sciences Blog - Category: Science Authors: Tags: OMICS Anxiety Disorders bipolar disorders cardiovascular cases heart attacks heart diseases psychological factors Source Type: blogs
Discussion, we all know why they performed this study, what they expected it to show, and how it will be cited for years to come. It demonstrates an association between morphine and worse outcomes in patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). I don’t know why everyone has been ganging up on poor old morphine for acute coronary syndrome (ACS)—maybe because it’s been beloved by so many for so long—but while I may not be able to empathize with the hardships of being popular, I sympathize with the hate it’s been receiving and hope to offer some exculpation.   How did we g...
Source: EMS 12-Lead - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Original Articles Vince DiGiulio Source Type: research
This study aimed to establish the relationship between various items on two questionnaires used to measure IA and DM: the MAIA (Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness), and the FFMQ (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire). The paper itself discusses the first measure as empirically derived and confirmed by focus groups, and having associations with less trait anxiety, emotional susceptibility and depression – in other words, high scores on this measure (awareness of body sensations and judging those sensations) are associated with important factors influencing our wellbeing. The second measure is descr...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Resilience Science in practice biopsychosocial Health mindfulness self management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs
In August, The New York Times published a guest op-ed by a man named David Roberts who suffered from severe chronic pain for many years before finally finding relief. The piece immediately went viral, with distinguished news journalist and personality Dan Rather posting it to his Facebook page with the addendum that it could “offer hope” to some pain patients. However, for many of us in the chronic pain community, particularly women, the piece was regarded with weariness and frustration. The first and most prominent source of annoyance for me regarding this piece was the part when the author finally discloses h...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Pain Management Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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