Drug combination effective to treat male infertility

Combination therapy of drugs clomiphene citrate and anastrozole is a safe and effective way to treat infertility in males, a study inBJU International suggests.News Medical
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

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In this study, we evaluated 198 patients (infertile group: 130, control group: 68). Patients that fit the inclusion criteria were informed about the aim and method of the study and filled out sociodemographic data collection form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), The Somatosensory Amplification Scale (SSAS), and Health Anxiety Inventory (HAI) questionnaires. RESULTS: The mean scores for SSAS, HAI, BAI, and BDI were significantly higher in the infertility group compared to the control group (p
Source: Psychiatry Investigation - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatry Investig Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 6 April 2020Source: Prostaglandins &Other Lipid MediatorsAuthor(s): Mariangela Longini, Elena Moretti, Cinzia Signorini, Daria Noto, Francesca Iacoponi, Giulia Collodel
Source: Prostaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators - Category: Lipidology Source Type: research
This article aims to define the optimal endocrine workup of male factor infertility, including evaluation and treatment of men who have previously been on exogenous testosterone or anabolic steroids. Future directions include the expansion of genetic testing for infertility to include endocrine gene products.
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
A male factor is a contributor in 50% of cases of infertility. Although assisted reproductive techniques can often bypass the need to improve semen parameters, the evaluation of the infertile man remains critical. Current methods for evaluating the infertile man are discussed, beginning with the basic workup that all suspected infertile men should undergo, followed by subsequent evaluation steps. Although the fundamental components of the evaluation have remained consistent, several new tools are available to assist in identifying the underlying etiology. As our understanding of male fertility expands, the technologies ava...
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
UROLOGIC CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Male infertility is a common and devastating disease. Despite the advances in the field, we still struggle to identify, diagnose, and treat this condition. Furthermore, the field of reproductive urology trails at least 20 years behind that of female infertility. With 1% of children in the United States now born through in  vitro fertilization and up to 2% to 3% in Europe, some recent high-profile papers highlighting declining sperm counts around the world, and other data linking male infertility to poor individual and familial somatic health, it is vital that we focus our efforts on understanding this disease.
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Preface Source Type: research
Infertility caused by chemotherapy or radiation treatments negatively impacts patient-survivor quality of life. The only fertility preservation option available to prepubertal boys who are not making sperm is cryopreservation of testicular tissues that contain spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) with potential to produce sperm and/or restore fertility. SSC transplantation to regenerate spermatogenesis in infertile adult survivors of childhood cancers is a mature technology. However, the number of SSCs obtained in a biopsy of a prepubertal testis may be small. Therefore, methods to expand SSC numbers in culture before transpla...
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
Although infertility is now recognized as a disease by multiple organizations including the World Health Organization and the American Medical Association, private insurance companies rarely include coverage for infertility treatments. In this review, the authors assess the current state of care delivery for male infertility care in the United States. They discuss the scope of male infertility as well as the unique burdens it places on patients and review emerging market forces that could affect the future of care delivery for male infertility.
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
With male factor infertility accounting for up to 50% of infertility cases, demand for male fertility services has increased. Integrating a reproductive urologist within a fertility center allows for treatment of both partners simultaneously with easier, more convenient access to a comprehensive male evaluation and any indicated interventions. A joint practice allows urologists to collaborate more closely with reproductive endocrinologists, which can, in turn, improve clinical care and research endeavors. This full-service, streamlined approach translates to optimized care for the infertile couple and allows for emphasis o...
Source: Urologic Clinics of North America - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Source Type: research
(American Institute of Physics) Infertility is estimated to affect 9% of reproductive-aged couples globally, and many couples turn to assisted reproductive technology. Selecting embryos with maximum development potential plays a pivotal role in obtaining the highest rate of success. Researchers can evaluate the quality of an embryo by detecting the content of proteins secreted. In Biomicrofluidics, a method to detect trace proteins secreted by embryos using microfluidic droplets and multicolor fluorescence holds promise to select embryos for ART.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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